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The

Last of the Old Squires.

“ His Neighbours then did bless him,
His Servants now do miss him,
The Poor would gladly kiss him,

Alive again to be;
But God hath wrought his Pleasure,
And bleft him out of Measure,
With Heaven and earthly Treasure,
So good a God is he!"
Tusser's Five Hundred Points of Good

Husbandry.

“A good and charitable Man of superior Rank or Wisdom, Fortune, Authority, a common Blessing to the Place he lives in ; Happiness grows under his Influence.”

Butler's Sermon, xii. 216. Upon the

Love of our Neighbour.

THE

Last of the Old Squires ;

A SKETCH

BY CEDRIC OLDACRE, ESQ.

OF SAX-NORMANBURY.

SOMETIME OF CHRIST-CHURCH, Oxon.

“ His Life was gentle: and the Elements
So mixed in him, that Nature might stand up
And say to all the World, This was a MAN!”

Julius Cæsar, A& v. Sc. v.

“ A Place in Time
Is given us, only that we may prepare
Our Portion for Eternity: the Soul
Poffefseth there what Treasures for itself,
Wise to Salvation, it laid up in Heaven.”

SOUTHEY's Inscriptions, iii. 162.
“ My Name I did not publish, as not willing it should sway
the Reader, either for me, or against me.”

Milton, To the Parliament, P. W. fi. 297.

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LONGMAN, BROWN, GREEN, AND LONGMANS.

1854

249. Ja, 47.

“ Something oddly The Book-man prated, yet he talked it weeping.”

FORD, The Broken Heart, Act. iv. Sc. i.

“ Nescio, tu quibus es, Lector, lecturus ocellis Hoc scio, quod ficcis fcribere non potui.”

Fox, AEts and Monuments.

“ Excuse my Tears,
It is a Tribute I must pay his Memory,
For I did love my Father.”

SHIRLEY, The Brothers, Act iv. Sc. v. V

TO THE READER.

P

HIS little Sketch of The LAST OF

THE OLD SQUIRES will speak for
itself. It is only requisite to re-

mark that although a Fiction in its Form, there is yet a good deal of Reality in its Substance. It, in Fact, contains the Reminifcences of Years gone by, of several Highbred Country Squires,—and of one excellent Country Gentleman in particular. Possibly, too, there are those living who may give to the Description of the Old Church " a local Habitation and a Name;" and they may do this without committing any very grave Error. It may

be added that all the little Anecdotes and Conversations are real,—more or less; as are the Facts in the Chapter on Natural HisTORY, each and every of which may not have been noted and observed by The Last OF THE OLD SQUIRES, though most of them were.

Possibly when the Sound and Din of War, and the Fray of Battle is ringing in our Ears, such a Publication as this may suggest a Peaceful Resting-place for peaceable Souls, and give rise to Thoughts of Peace and Prayers for Peace! Gentle and patient Readers all,

Pax VOBISCUM !

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THE AUTHOR.

May 12th, 1854.

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