The Principles and Practice of Surgery

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Lea, 1882 - Surgery - 1031 pages
 

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Page 357 - INSTRUCTIONS. — 1. Treat the patient INSTANTLY, ON THE SPOT, IN THE OPEN AIR, EXPOSING the face and chest to the BREEZE (except in severe weather).
Page v - The work has been brought well up to date, and is larger and better illustrated than before, and its author may rest assured that it will certainly have a " continuance of the favor with which it has heretofore been received."— The American Journal of the Medical Sciences, Jan.
Page 553 - ... and at the junction of the upper and middle thirds of the thigh, in that of the lower extremity.
Page 357 - When the prone position is resumed, make equable but efficient pressure, with brisk movement, along the back of the chest, removing it immediately before rotation on the side [the first measure augments the expiration, the second commences inspiration].
Page 357 - Place the patient gently on the face with one WRIST under the forehead ; [all fluids and the tongue itself then fall...
Page 326 - seen the trephine applied under such circumstances, and matter evacuated, but without any permanent benefit. Indeed, the successful issue of a case of trephining for matter between the bone and dura mater is, I believe, all but unknown to surgeons of our own time.
Page 357 - Treat the patient instantly on the spot, in the open air, freely exposing the face, neck, and chest to the breeze, except in severe weather.
Page 335 - Ktate of the spine," says Mr. Erichsen, "will be found to be the real cause of these symptoms. On examining it by pressure, by percussion, or by the application of the hot sponge, it will be found that it is painful, and that its sensibility is exalted at one, two, or three points. These are usually the upper cervical, the middle dorsal, and the lumbar regions. The exact...
Page v - The author, long known as a thorough student of surgery, and one of the most accomplished scholars in the country, aims to give in this work "a condensed but comprehensive description of the modes of practice now generally employed in the treatment of surgical affections, with a plain exposition of the pr1nciples upon which these modes of practice are based.
Page 648 - ... according to the age of the patient, and the severity of the...

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