The Knickerbocker: Or, New-York Monthly Magazine, Volume 51

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Charles Fenno Hoffman, Timothy Flint, Lewis Gaylord Clark, John Holmes Agnew, Kinahan Cornwallis
 

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Page 548 - The hills Rock-ribbed and ancient as the sun; the vales Stretching in pensive quietness between; The venerable woods, rivers that move In majesty, and the complaining brooks That make the meadows green; and, poured round all, Old Ocean's gray and melancholy waste, — Are but the solemn decorations all Of the great tomb of man.
Page 411 - Then the moon shall be confounded, and the sun ashamed, when the Lord of Hosts shall reign in mount Zion, and in Jerusalem, and before his ancients gloriously.
Page 165 - Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life, that I might take it again. No man taketh it from me, but I lay it down of myself. I have power to lay it down, and I have power to take it again. This commandment have I received of my Father.
Page 55 - Neither do they which go by say, The blessing of the LORD be upon you: we bless you in the name of the LORD.
Page 282 - But all was false and hollow ; though his tongue Dropped manna, and could make the worse appear The better reason, to perplex and dash Maturest counsels...
Page 159 - They mount up to the heaven, they go down again to the depths : their soul is melted because of trouble. They reel to and fro, and stagger like a drunken man, and are at their wit's end.
Page 411 - O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, thou that killest the prophets, and stonest them that are sent unto thee; how often would I have gathered thy children together, even as a hen gathereth her chickens under her wings ! and ye would not...
Page 324 - I find the great thing in this world is not so much where we stand, as in what direction we are moving: To reach the port of heaven, we must sail sometimes with the wind and sometimes against it, — but we must sail, and not drift, nor lie at anchor.
Page 291 - Egypt's evil day, waved round the coast, up called a pitchy cloud of locusts, warping on the eastern wind that o'er the realm of impious Pharaoh hung like night and darkened all the land of Nile...
Page 205 - And is there nothing yet unsaid, Before the change appears? Remember, all their gifts have fled With those dissolving years.

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