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351 (c), 701 (d), and 702 (b) of the Revenue Act of 1934, sections 62, 403, and 530 of the Revenue Act of 1932, section 62 of the Revenue Act of 1928, sections 257 and 1101 of the Revenue Act of 1926, section 905 (c) of the Social Security Act, and sections 215 (e) and 216 (b) of the National Industrial Recovery Act, the following regulations are hereby prescribed with respect to the use of original, and the furnishing of copies of, returns open to inspection in accordance with T. D. 4873, or otherwise; with respect to examinations by shareholders of the returns of corporations; by State officers of returns of corporations made under the income, capital stock, or excess-profits tax provisions of the Revenue Act of 1926, the Revenue Act of 1928, the Revenue Act of 1932, sections 215 and 216 of the National Industrial Recovery Act, the Revenue Act of 1934, the Revenue Act of 1935, the Revenue Act of 1936, the Revenue Act of 1938, and under title IX of the Social Security Act, except income and excess-profits tax returns and returns for the purpose of surtax on personal holding companies for years beginning after December 31, 1934; with respect to the inspection of returns under title III of the Revenue Act of 1936 by any official, body, or commission, lawfully charged with the administration of any State tax law; and with respect to the inspection of estate and gift tax returns made under the Revenue Act of 1932 and filed prior to June 17, 1933, and made under the Revenue Act of 1926 and under prior revenue acts. For inspection by State taxing officials of income returns other than returns under title III of the Revenue Act of 1936, for any taxable year beginning after December 31, 1934, see articles 55 (b)-1 to 55 (b)-4, inclusive, of Regulations 86, as substituted by T. D. 4626, C. B. XV-1, p. 61, 71, and articles 55 (b)-1 to 55 (b) 4, inclusive, of Regulations 94, both as amended by T. D. 4732, C. B. 1937-1, p. 145, and section 55 of the Revenue Act of 1938.

Part I.-Income and excess-profits tax returns, except returns under

title III of the Revenue Act of 1936, capital stock tax returns, and returns under title IX of the Social Security Act

ARTICLE 1. Definitions.—When used in part I of these regulations

(a) the term "return” means the original return (except a return under title III of the Revenue Act of 1936) made for income, excessprofits, or capital stock tax purposes, or for purposes of the tax imposed by title IX of the Social Security Act;

(b) the term "corporation” includes associations, joint-stock companies, and insurance companies;

(c) the term "partnership" includes a syndicate, group, pool, joint venture, or other unincorporated organization, through or by means of which any business, financial operation, or venture is carried on, and which is not, within the meaning of the Federal tax laws, a trust or estate or a corporation;

(d) the term "stock" includes shares in an association, joint-stock company, or insurance company; and the term "shareholder" includes a member in an association, joint-stock company, or insurance company.

ART. 2. Access to returns by State officers.-(1) The proper officers of a State are entitled as of right upon the request of its governor to have access to the returns of a corporation or to an abstract thereof, showing its name and income.

(2) The request or application of the governor must be in writing, signed by him under the seal of his State, and must show why access is desired, and the names and official positions of the officers designated to have the access. The request or application should be addressed to the Commissioner, who will set a convenient time and place for the access to the returns (or to an abstract thereof as he may determine).

(3) Access shall be given only in the office of the Commissioner, unless such returns are in the custody of a collector of internal revenue or internal revenue agent in charge, in which event the return may be inspected in the office of such collector or agent, but only in the presence of an internal-revenue officer designated by the collector or agent for that purpose.

ART. 3. Examination of returns by shareholder.--A bona fide shareholder of record owning one percent or more of the outstanding stock of a corporation shall be entitled as of right, upon making request of the Commissioner, to examine the returns of such corporation and of its subsidiaries. His request for permission to examine such returns must be made in writing, verified by affidavit, and shall show his address, the name of the corporation, the period of time covered by the return he desires to inspect, the amount of the corporation's outstanding capital stock, the number of shares owned by him, the date when he acquired them, and whether he has the beneficial as well as the record title to such shares. It shall also show that he has not acquired his shares for the purpose of the examination of the returns of the corporation. If he has acquired them for such purpose, he is not a bona fide shareholder within the meaning of the statute. The application shall be supported by satisfactory evidence showing that the applicant is a bona fide shareholder of record of the required amount of stock of the corporation. The supporting evidence may be in the form of a certificate signed by the president or vice president of the corporation and countersigned by the secretary under the corporate seal. Upon being satisfied from the evidence presented that the applicant has fully met these conditions, the Commissioner will grant the permission to examine the returns and set a convenient time and place for the examination. This privilege is personal and will be granted only to the shareholder, who cannot delegate it to another. In the case of a corporation which has been dissolved, the returns may be examined by any person who would have been entitled to examine them at the date of dissolution.

ART. 4. Penalties for disclosure of returns.-Section 3167, Revised Statutes, as amended by the Revenue Act of 1918 and reenacted without change by section 1115 of the Revenue Act of 1926, makes it a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not exceeding $1,000.00 or by imprisonment not exceeding one year, or both, at the discretion of the court, for any person to print or publish in any manner whatever not provided by law information contained in any income return, and further provides that if the offender be an officer or employee of the United States he shall be dismissed from office or discharged from employment. The penalties provided in section 3167, Revised Statutes, are applicable also to disclosure of information contained in excess-profits and capital stock tax returns and returns made under title IX of the Social Security Act.

Part II.-Returns under title 111 of the Revenue Act of 1936 ARTICLE 1.' Inspection of returns by State taxing officials.-Original returns of taxes imposed by title III shall be open to inspection, at convenient times and places, by any official, body, or commission lawfully charged with the administration of any State tax law, or by the representatives of such official, body, or commission designated in writing by the governor of the State, for the purpose of such administration, or for the purpose of obtaining information to be furnished to local taxing authorities, as provided in section 55 (b) (1) and (2) of the Revenue Act of 1936. Requests for permission to inspect the returns must be in writing signed by the governor under the seal of his State, and must be addressed to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, Records Division, Washington, D. C. The request shall state (a) the kind of returns it is desired to inspect, (b) the taxable year or years covered by the returns it is desired to inspect, (c) the name of the official, body, or commission by whom or which the inspection is to be made, (d) the name of the representative of such official, body, or commission designated to make the inspection, (e) by specific references, the State tax law which such official, body, or commission is charged with administering and the law under which he, she, or it is so charged, (f) the purpose for which the inspection is to be made, and (g) if the inspection is for the purpose of obtaining information to be furnished to local taxing authorities, (1) the name of the official, body, or commission of any political subdivision of the State, lawfully charged with the administration of the tax laws of such political subdivision, if any, to whom or to which the information secured by the inspection is to be furnished, and (2) the purpose for which the information is to be used by such official, body, or commission.

0 ART. 2.1[Examination of returns by shareholder.—A bona fide shareholder of record owning one percent or more of the outstanding stock, of a corporation shall be sentitled as of right, upon making request of the Commissioner, sto examine the returns of such corporation and of its subsidiaries. His request for permission to examine such returns shall be made in writing, verified by affidavit, and shall show his address, the name of the corporation, the period of time covered by the return he desires to inspect, the amount of the corporation's outstanding capital stock, the number of shares owned by him, the date when he acquired them, and whether he has the beneficial as well as the record title to such shares. It shall also show that he has not acquired his shares for the purpose of the examination of the returns of the corporation. If he has acquired them for such purpose, he is not a bona fide shareholder within the meaning of the statute. The application shall be supported by satisfactory evidence showing that the applicant is a bona fide shareholder of record of the required amount of stock of the corporation. The supporting evidence may be in the form of a certificate signed by the president or vice president of the corporation and countersigned by the secretary under the corporate seal. Upon being satisfied from the evidence presented that the applicant has fully met these conditions, the Commissioner will grant the permission to examine the returns and set a convenient time and place for the examination. This privilege is personal and will be granted only to the shareholder, who cannot delegate it to another. In the case of a corporation which has been dissolved, the returns may be examined by any person who would have been entitled to examine them at the date of dissolution.

PART III.Estate and gift tax returns filed on or before June 16, 1933

Estate tax returns and notices, and gift tax returns, shall be treated as privileged communications and shall not be inspected nor their contents disclosed, except as follows:

ARTICLE 1. Inspection by executor or donor.–Upon application to the Commissioner an estate tax return or notice may be inspected by the executor, or his successor in office, or by his duly authorized attorney in fact. Upon like application a gift tax return may be inspected by the donor or by his duly authorized attorney in fact.

Art. 2. Disclosure of information by revenue officer.-An internalrevenue officer engaged in an official investigation of an estate tax or gift tax liability may disclose the returned value of any item or the amount of any specific deduction or other limited information, if such disclosure is necessary in order to verify the same or to arrive at a correct determination of the tax. This right of disclosure, however, is limited to the purposes of the investigation, and in no case extends to such information as the amount of the estate, the amount of tax, or other general data.

ART. 3. Inspection by State officers.-Upon written application to the Commissioner, a return or notice may be exhibited, or information contained therein may be disclosed, to an officer of any State, for official use in connection with an estate, inheritance, legacy, succession, gift, or other tax of the State, provided a like cooperation is given by the State to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue or his representatives for use in the administration of the Federal tax laws. Such officer may also be permitted to inspect schedules, lists, and other statements designed to be supplemental to, or to become a part of, the original return, and other records and reports which contain information included or required by statute to be included in the return.

ART. 4. Inspection by person having material interest.—If any other person has a material interest in ascertaining any fact disclosed by the return, or in obtaining information as to the payment of the tax, he may make a written application to the Commissioner of Internal Revenue for such information, setting forth the nature of his interest and the purpose of the application. Thereupon, the Commissioner may permit an inspection of, or furnish a copy of, the return, or may furnish such information as he deems advisable.

ART. 5. Inspection by Government attorneys.-Returns shall be open to inspection by a United States Attorney or by an attorney of the Department of Justice in the course of his official duties. The request for inspection shall be in writing and, except as provided in article 6, shall be addressed to the Commissioner, and shall state the purpose for which inspection is desired. It may be signed by the Attorney General, the Assistant to the Attorney General, an Assistant Attorney General, or a United States Attorney.

ART. 6. Returns in custody of collector or revenue agent in charge. If the return is in the custody of a collector or internal revenue agent in charge, such collector or agent in charge may, upon like written request made to him, permit inspection thereof by a United States Attorney or an attorney of the Department of Justice. Upon written application to him such collector or agent in charge may also permit inspection by the executor or his successor in office, or his duly authorized attorney in fact, in case of estate tax returns, or the donor or his duly authorized attorney in fact in case of gift tax returns, in accordance with these regulations.

PART IV.-General provisions

ARTICLE 1. Use of returns in litigation.—The return of an individual, partnership, corporation, or fiduciary, or a copy thereof, may be furnished to a United States Attorney for official use in proceedings before a United States grand jury or in litigation in any court, if the United States is interested in the result, or for use in preparation for such

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