A Midsummer Night's Dream: Shakespeare: The Critical Tradition, Volume 7

Front Cover
Judith M. Kennedy, Richard F. Kennedy
A&C Black, Oct 1, 1999 - Drama - 488 pages
This study traces the response to "A Midsummer Night's Dream" from Shakespeare's day to the present, including critics from Britain, Europe and America.
 

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Contents

INTRODUCTION
1
1 Moral conventions and human sympathy 1775
59
2 Artists interpretations of dramatic effects 1787
63
3 Commentary on A Midsummer Nights Dream 1790
66
4 Bottom as coxcomb 1792
70
5 Response to Malone 1793
74
6 Illustrations of some passages 1794
76
7 His fertile and creative fancy 1800
79
45 Bottom an ass but no fool 1873
238
46 A Midsummer Nights Dream as masque 1874
241
the Real the Ideal and the Representation 1874
245
48 Shakespeare differentiated from Bacon 1875
253
49 Theseus as the central figure 1875
256
50 A comedy of incident 1875
259
51 Consummation of Shakespeares lyrical genius 1876
262
52 Bottom a selfmade man 1876
264

8 On metre invention and a unified whole 1815
81
9 Unity of feeling and of imagery and the fairies 1817
84
10 Bottom Puck and the incompatibility of poetry and the stage 1817
90
11 Malones last words 1821
94
12 Mainly on the fairies 1824
97
13 The fairy world the clowns the poetry 1828
101
14 New actors on the mimic scenethe fairies 1828
105
15 Marginalia and other notes 1836
108
16 Bottom the lucky man 1837
111
17 Critics refuted 1838
118
18 Originality in structure machinery and language 1839
121
19 The Pictorial Edition of A Midsummer Nights Dream 1839
123
20 The poets dream 1840
130
21 Anachronisms Nick Bottom as Midas and stage representation 1841
132
22 Oberons Vision allegorized 1843
137
23 Fairy drama and human nature 1843
142
24 Poet of the Fairies 1844
145
25 A comment with some explanatory notes 1845
148
26 The theme of selfparody 1846
153
27 Introductory remarks 1847
157
28 The sister arts and the plays structural balance 1848
162
29 A festival of dainties 1851
168
30 The Dream and Art 1851 1872 1883 1884
173
31 A most charming entertainment of the stage 1853
177
32 Samuel Phelpss Bottom 1853
181
33 Dramatic and poetic art 1854
184
34 Dialogue with a sceptic 1854
190
35 Critical remarks on the play 1856
197
36 Celtic elements 1859
203
37 Genre and inner purpose 1863
206
38 Intuitive power of characterization 1863
214
39 The plays limitations 1864
217
40 The sacred mysteries in the play 1865
219
41 The secret meaning of the Interlude 1865
225
42 The perfection of imbecilic clowns 1866
229
43 Not critics but lowly worshippers of the Beautiful 1869
232
44 The theme is love 1871
235
53 The full glow of fancy and fun 1877
267
54 The wood is the world 1879
270
55 Titania and Ovid 1880
274
56 A Platonic reading 1884
277
57 Interpreting the spoken verse 1885
281
58 Observations on the lovers and the mechanicals 1886
288
59 Poet rather than dramatist 1888
292
60 Source of the plays popularity 1888
295
61 Classical and modern 1890
298
62 Reason and desire in Oberon and Titania 1890
303
63 The development of morality and art 1891
307
64 A true work of art 1894
313
65 The duration of the action 1895
317
66 Life and art 1895
321
67 Daly and the idea of titivation 1895
324
68 Remarks on the play and modern education 1895
328
69 Theseus Bottom and the Interlude 1896
332
70 The central idea 1897
335
71 The airy dream 1898
339
72 Illusion realism and imagination 1900
343
73 Dream visions 1903
346
74 A comedy of situation and enchantment 1903
353
75 Shakespeares working classes 1903
357
76 The atmosphere of the play 1904
360
77 Love dreamland and Helena 1905
365
78 The theme of illusion 1907
368
79 The nature and sources of the play 1908
370
80 The most beautiful work of man 1909
373
81 Shakespeares conception of his art 1911
374
82 Screeds of wordmusic 1914
378
Puck Oberon and Titania 1916
381
84 The dreams validity 1917
383
85 Comedy of love 1920
386
NOTES
389
SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
419
INDEX
436
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About the author (1999)

Judith M. Kennedy is Professor Emeritus at St. Thomas University, New Brunswick, US.

Richard F. Kennedy is Professor Emeritus at St. Thomas University, New Brunswick, US.

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