Amos and the Cosmic Imagination

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Ashgate Publishing, Ltd., 2008 - Religion - 199 pages
Said to contain the words of the earliest of the biblical prophets (8th century BCE), the book of Amos is reinterpreted by James Linville in light of new and sometimes controversial historical approaches to the Bible. Amos is read as the literary product of the Persian-era community in Judah. Its representations of divine-human communication are investigated in the context of the ancient writers' own role as transmitters and shapers of religious traditions. Amos's extraordinary poetry expresses mythical conceptions of divine manifestation and a process of destruction and recreation of the cosmos which reveals that behind the appearances of the natural world is a heavenly, cosmic temple.
 

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Contents

II
1
III
3
IV
13
V
39
VI
41
VII
47
VIII
69
IX
81
XII
113
XIII
121
XIV
131
XV
133
XVI
151
XVII
159
XVIII
177
XIX
187

X
99
XI
101

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About the author (2008)

James R. Linville is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies in the Department of Religious Studies, University of Lethbridge, Canada.

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