Ethnoregional Conflict in Democracies: Mostly Ballots, Rarely Bullets

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Greenwood Publishing Group, Jan 1, 1996 - Political Science - 279 pages
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Most advanced industrial democracies have been successful in controlling ethnic political conflicts peacefully. This book examines ethnoregional conflicts in seven ethnoregions--in Scotland, Flanders, Wallonia, Brussels, Quebec, Northern Ireland, and the Basque region of Spain--to explain what mactors determine electoral support for ethnoregional parties, why in some cases electoral conflict has co-existed with ethnic violence, and why there appears to be an inverse relationship between electoral success and policy success among many ethnoregional parties. As ethnic conflicts--peaceful and violent--continue to rage around the world, this important new study merits the attention of scholars and students in comparative politics and ethnic studies.

 

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Contents

Ethnoregional Politics in Democracies
1
The Scottish National Party Ethnic Politics and Class Conflict
23
Belgium Ethnic Conflict and Elite Accommodation
57
The Parti Quebecois Electoral Success and Policy Failure in a Hybrid System
107
Northern Ireland Ethnic Violence in a Democracy
147
The Basque Country Ballots and Bullets in a Democratizing State
175
Ethnic Conflict and Political Order
211
Appendix
245
Select Bibliography
249
Index
269
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About the author (1996)

SAUL NEWMAN is Associate Professor of Government at American University. His articles have appeared in journals such as World Politics, Ethnic and Racial Studies, Regional Politics and Policy, and Nationalism and Ethnic Politics.

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