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of Waters, and its navigable tributaries, which naturally engages the favorable attention of our people; and connected therewith the construction of proper canals, with which to connect the river and the great lakes, an improvement which would inure to the advantage of the whole of the Northwest. I am earnestly favorable to these proposed improvements, and trust that Congress will not longer hesitate in appropriations thereto. One of the most important of these is the project of the “Hennepin Canal” which if constructed, can not fail to be a valuable help in securing low through rates for our products. As I view the situation, every dollar saved in transportation adds to the value of our farms and manufactures, and thus both directly and indirectly, to the wealth and progress of the State. I should hail with real enthusiasm any measure which will contribute to this end, so much desired by every material interest of the State.

This policy of protection to home interests, like that of providing a safe and sound national currency, is one of gravest national importance. We cannot expect to thrive, if our entire attention be given to the productive or agricultural interests of the nation. The best market is that of the home, and to my mind, the diversified interests of the State are at once its profit and protection. Could we induce the establishing of large manufacturing interests among us, and therewith accomplish the home consumption of the surplus of our farms, we have reached a degree of independence which places us far in advance of those governments which make barter of their labor, and reduce it to servitude and competition of countries whose entire interest is subservient and wholly subordinate to the domination of a few industries. What we need is the upbuilding the entire business of the whole nation, the development of the American system of protection of ourselves, when brought in competition with the pauper labor of other lands, which, if allowed “free course” would inevitably result in the deterioration of our own personal as well as national interests. The late political contest in the several States partook largely of this nature, and the result is conclusive proof of the fealty of the people to the American doctrine, so called because its distinguishing feature is home intrenchment and the protection of home interests. Neither the influx of foreign gold nor the labors of hired agents can disturb the people in their enthusiastic devotion to the correct and distinguishing American policy which has prevailed for over half a century, and under which we have advanced to the front in National rank, and to follow which will yet further advance the material interests of the whole people.

During all these years we have progressed more rapidly and solidly than ever before, and I take it for granted the policy of the country is so well settled in this regard that no change can result, and following the well beaten and experienced paths which have led to permanent prosperity, they will continue the highways of the nation, until both national independence is secured and the business interests of all the people solidly planted. It is not too much to say, the Nation is the pride of its every citizen and stands forth the prominence of the political world.

In assuming, for the second time, the office of Chief Magistrate of the State, I fully realize my grateful obligations to the people of Iowa, through whose generous confidence I am here. I am aware the duties and grave responsibilities of this exalted position, and as well what is expected of me therein. As in the past I have given my undivided time and serious attention thereto, so in the future I promise the most earnest devotion, and untiring effort, in the faithful performance of my official requirements. I have seen the State grow from infancy to mature manhood, and each year one of substan. tial betterment its previous position.

With more railroads than any other State, save two,—with a school interest, the grandest and strongest, which commands the support and

we ren

confidence of all the people, and a population, which in its entirety, is superior to any other in the sisterhood,—it is not strange the pride which attaches to our people. When we remember that the results of our efforts in the direction of good government have been crowned with such magnificent success, and to-day we have a State in most perfect physical and financial condition, no wonder our hearts swell in honest pride, as we contemplate the past, and so confidently hope the future. What we may become, depends our own efforts, and to that future I look with earnest and abiding confidence.

Fellow citizens, the past has disappeared from view, the future only is ours. It remains to us that improvement be our solace and congratulations, and if that future be responsive as has been the past, then at its conclusion, we may have the satisfaction of feeling that

“We have not labored in vain,
Nor spent our strength for naught.”

BUREN R. SHERMAN.

INAUGURATION

THE STATE CAPITOL

AT

DES MOINES, IOWA,

ADDRESS DELIVERED BEFORE THE TWENTIETH GENERAL

ASSEMBLY BY

Hon. JOHN A. KASSON,

UPON INVITATION OF THE GOVERNOR AND GENERAL ASSEMBLY,

JANUARY 17, 1884.

PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY.

DES MOINES:
GEO. E. ROBERTS, STATE PRINTER.

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