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OF THE

CENTRAL STATION

OF THE

Iowa Weather Service.

(PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY.)

DES MOINES:
GEO. E. ROBERTS, STATE PRINTER.

To His Excellency, BUREN R. SHERMAN, Governor of Iova:

Sir-I have the honor to submit to you the third biennial report of the Central Station of the Iowa Weather Service. Very respectfully yours,

Gustavus HINRICHS,

Director Iowa Weather Service. CENTRAL STATION, I. W. S.,

Iowa City, Iowa, October, 1883.

THIRD BIENNIAL REPORT.

The Iowa Weather Service has completed its third biennial period of work. As completely as possible, a reliable record of the remarkable weather of the last two years has been made, interesting and valuable to the present, and of increasing importance as the years roll by. Some of the most noted features were indicated by us long in advance of their coming; the mildness of the winter of 1181-2, and the severity of the past winter, were indicated in advance, and even the special days of late frosts, dangerous to fruit blossoms, were successfully marked in midwinter, and proper means of mitigating their effects were given.

These indications of the general character of a season are only given by way of example, in order to show that it is possible by means of the studies we are making to obtaining useful indications of the coming season's weather as to its general character. It is in this direction that the greatest promise of really practically useful results are reasonably hoped for by careful and cautious study of reliable observations made according to a uniform system. Such work is very slow, əxtremely tedious, and to the many seems thoroughly useless; yet every true observation made by any of our observers at any station in Iowa will, when properly reduced and classified at the Central Station, constitute an additional link in the chain which binds the past to the future.

As to warnings of the approach of storms, or the indication of the probable character of the weather on the next day, it must be admitted as a fact, that no general system of useful warnings, reaching the parties most interested, has yet been devised. A careful survey of the entire field covered by this branch of meteorology leads me to the conclusion that all elaborate methods used at present are essentially in error and practically of little use. From a careful

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