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Below find list of expenditures for the time passed since the appropriation was divided between the two hatching-houses. All of which is respectfully submitted for your approval,

A. A. MOSHER,

Assistant Fish Commissioner. Spirit LAKE, Iowa, August 8, 1883.

OF THE

JOINT COMMITTEE

OF THE

TWENTIETH GENERAL ASSEMBLY

OF THE

STATE OF IOWA,

APPOINTED TO VISIT THE

STATE HATCHING HOUSE

LOCATED AT

ANA MOSA.

PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY.

DES MOINES:
GEO. E. ROBERTS, STATE PRINTBR.

REPORT

To the Twentieth General Assembly of the State of Iowa:

Your committee appointed by Joint Resolution No. 10, Twentieth General Assembly, to visit the State Hatching House, at Anamosa, Iowa, would respectfully report;

That, on the 6th day of February, 1884, we visited the Hatching House, under the control of the State Fish Commissioner, B. F. Shaw, situated on twenty acres of land, owned by the State, three miles southwest of Anamosa, Jones county, Iowa. The location is well adapted to fish breeding and raising, being furnished with an abundant supply of warm spring water. This supply of water first passes through the fish hatching house, used for hatching purposes, and here we find, in the numerous troughs now on hand and ready for distribution, 1,250,000 salmon lake trout. 600,000 white fish. 200,000 siskowet. 110,000 brook trout. 12,000 McLoud River, California, trout.

2,500 German carp. The above named have been hatched out during the last three months, and will be distributed before the first day of May. In addition to this, we find four ponds filled with about 2,000 fish, ranging from one to ten pounds. The purpose of these fish, we are informed by our Commissioner, is for breeding, as well as an illustration to show the perfection of practical fish culture.

Furthermore, we find eleven additional carp breeding ponds, built since the report of the visiting committee of the Nineteenth General Assembly. These ponds were built especially for breeding German carps, of which we find a good supply on hand for that purpose.

There has been a continuous distribution of fish by the Commissioner, the distribution for the past two years amounting to 3,454.840. The result of this planting in the various waters in the State has been very gratifying, as will be seen by the letters on file at the office of Fish Commissioner Shaw.

W. H. French, of Cedar Rapids, writes in reference to the trout planted in Linn county in 1879: “I caught 300, weighing nearly one pound each. In 1880 I took about 1,200 by actual count, some weighing one pound or more. I am sure as many more were caught by other parties. In 1881 I took 400 weighing one and one-half pounds each."

Hon. F. M. Knoll, of Dubuque county, writes, “The trout we have received from you are doing well. We have seen them almost daily. They are now of good size. All doubts as to its feasibility and usefulness have been removed from my mind." Mr. Knoll is an ex-member of the Legislature. These are only specimens of some two hundred or more letters on file at the office of Commissioner Shaw.

The result of the investigation by your committee has proven to us, beyond doubt, that fish can be successfully hatched and raised, at a profit in individual ponds, and although the fish culture of Iowa is yet in its infancy, our streams and lakes are showing the fruit of the different species of fish deposited by the Fish Commission. Twenty years ago hardly any person believed that fruit could be successfully raised in Iowa, much less that the product of her orchards would soon take the first premium at nearly all of the horticultural exhibitions where they were placed in competition. The fish culture, like the fruit, developes slowly, and at first makes a very meager showiny, but is all the time developing and doing a good work by educating the people in the science of pisciculture, which is engaging the attention of many of our sister states at the present time. “It is stated that in the fourteenth century a monk in Europe hatched by artificial process some fish eggs, but whether they were taken impregnated from the water where they were naturally cast or by artificial means we are not told. The first authenticated case of artificial impregnation is credited to an officer in the Prussian army-Lieut. Jacobi—the result of whose experiments were first published in 1763 No further advance seems to have been made in this science for nearly a hundred years, when a fisherman named Remy, in German France, was so successful with artificial impregnation that in 1851

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