An impartial history of Europe, from the death of Louis xvi. To which is prefixed, a sketch of the French revolution

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Page 244 - THE President of the United States of America, and the First Consul of the French Republic, in the name of the French people, desiring to remove all source of misunderstanding relative to objects of discussion, mentioned in the second and fifth articles of the convention of the 8th...
Page 448 - France only a secondary object ; and does not your majesty already possess more than you know how to preserve ? If your majesty would but reflect, you must perceive that the war is without an object, without any presumable result to yourself. Alas 1 what a melancholy prospect to cause two nations to fight merely for the sake of fighting.
Page 315 - ... and that for the future what has been observed, and ought to be observed, with regard to, and on the part of powers who are in the practice and possession of giving and receiving copies of like treaties in any other language...
Page 448 - ... there never was a more fortunate opportunity, nor a moment more favourable, to silence all the passions, and listen only to the sentiments of humanity and reason. This moment once lost, what end can be assigned to a war which all my efforts will not be able to terminate ? Your Majesty has gained more within ten years, both in territory and riches, than the whole extent of Europe. Your nation is at the highest point of prosperity; what can it hope from war...
Page 313 - XIX. The present definitive treaty of peace is declared common to the sublime Ottoman Porte, the ally of his Britannic majesty; and the sublime Porte shall be invited to transmit its act of accession as soon as possible.
Page 447 - I consider it as no disgrace to make the first step. I have, I hope, sufficiently proved to the world that I fear none of the chances of war...
Page 169 - I HAVE received and laid before the King the two letters which you have transmitted to me; and His majesty, seeing no reason to depart from those forms which have long been established in Europe for transacting business with Foreign States, has commanded me to return in his name, the official answer which I send you herewith inclosed.
Page 447 - Sir and Brother,— Called to the throne of France by Providence, and by the suffrages of the senate, the people, and the army, my first sentiment is a wish for peace. France and England abuse their prosperity. They may contend for ages ; but do their Governments well fulfil the most sacred of their duties, and will not so much blood, shed uselessly and without a view to any end, condemn them in their own consciences ? I consider it as no disgrace to make the first step.
Page 449 - Continent, with whom he is engaged in confidential connexions and relations, and particularly with the Emperor of Russia, who has given the strongest proofs of the wisdom and elevation o'f the sentiments with which he is animated, and the lively interest which he takes in the safety and independence of Europe.
Page 307 - Comino. 4.The forces of his Britannic majesty shall evacuate the island, and its dependencies, within three months from the exchange of the ratifications, or sooner if possible.

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