Sketches of the principal picture-galleries in England [repr. from The Lond. magazine]. With a criticism on 'Marriage a-la-mode'.

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Page 166 - Of living sapphire, once his native seat : And fast by, hanging in a golden chain, This pendent world, in bigness as a star Of smallest magnitude, close by the moon.
Page 148 - Autumn fills their beaks with corn, Filch'd from the careless Amalthea's horn ; And how the woods berries and worms provide Without their pains, when earth has nought beside To answer their small wants. To view the graceful deer come tripping by, Then stop, and gaze, then turn, they know not why, Like bashful younkers in society. To mark the structure of a plant or tree, And all fair things of earth, how fair they be.
Page 161 - Sacred City:" might not our Oxford be called so too ? There is an air about it resonant of joy and hope : it speaks with a thousand tongues to the heart : it waves its mighty shadow over the imagination : it stands in lowly sublimity on the " hill of ages," and points with prophetic fingers to the sky: it greets the eager gaze from afar " with glistening spires and pinnacles adorned...
Page 148 - Sometimes outstretcht, in very idleness, Nought doing, saying little, thinking less, To view the leaves, thin dancers upon air, Go eddying round...
Page 151 - ... often observable in the case of religious enthusiasts, there is a slenderness of constitutional stamina, which renders the flesh no match for the spirit. His bending, flexible form appears to take no strong hold of things, does not grapple with the world about him, but slides from it like a river 'And in its liquid texture mortal wound Receives no more than can the fluid air...
Page 148 - Nought doing, saying little, thinking less, To view the leaves, thin dancers upon air, Go eddying round and small birds how they fare...
Page 181 - She said; then raging to Sir Plume repairs, And bids her beau demand the precious hairs: (Sir Plume of amber snuff-box justly vain, And the nice conduct of a clouded cane...
Page 4 - Caracci, and look at nature with their eyes; we live in time past, and seem identified with the permanent forms of things. The business of the world at large, and even its pleasures, appear like a vanity and an impertinence. What signify the hubbub, the shifting scenery, the fantoccini figures, the folly, the idle fashions without, when compared with the solitude, the silence, the speaking looks, the unfading forms within? Here is the mind's true home. The contemplation of truth and beauty is the...
Page 162 - ... light as with the lustre of setting suns ; and a dream and a glory hover round its head, as the spirits of former times, a throng of intellectual shapes, are seen retreating or advancing to the eye of memory : its streets are paved with the names of learning that can never wear out : its green quadrangles breathe the silence of thought, conscious of the weight of yearnings innumerable after the past, of loftiest aspirations for the future...
Page 183 - The exquisite delicacy of the painting is only surpassed by the felicity and subtlety of the conception. Nothing can be more striking than the contrast between the extreme softness of her person and the hardened indifference of her character.

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