A topographical description of the province of Lower Canada

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author and published, 1815 - Land grants - 640 pages
 

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Page 3 - Vaudreuil, running north twenty-five degrees east until it strikes the Ottawa River, to ascend the said river into the Lake Temiscamingue, and from the head of the said lake by a line drawn due north until it strikes the Boundary Line of Hudson's Bay, including all the territory to the westward and southward of the said line, to the utmost extent of the country commonly called or known by the name of Canada...
Page 33 - ... miles; and as remarkable for the unrivalled transparency of its waters, as for its extraordinary depth. Its northern coast, indented with many extensive bays, is high and rocky ; but on the southern shore the land is generally low and level ; a sea almost of itself, it is subject to many vicissitudes of that element, for here the storm rages, and the billows break with a violence scarcely surpassed by the tempests of the ocean. In the distant range of mountains that forms the Land's Height, beyond...
Page 42 - Presque Isle, called the Devil's Nose, on the north ; the view on the south is well relieved with a back ground produced by the ridge of hills that, after forming the precipice for the cataract, stretches away to the eastward ; the finishing object of the prospect in this direction is a conical eminence towering above the chain of heights, called Fifty Mile Hill, as denoting its distance from the town of Niagara. Of the many rivers flowing into Lake Ontario, if the...
Page 469 - ... the grand battery, a work of great strength, armed with a formidable train of 24-pounders, and commanding the basin and passage of the river, which was here eighteen hundred and thirtyseven yards broad. From the battery another line was carried on beyond the Hope and Palace Gates, both of which were protected by similar defences to those of the Lower Town Gate until the line formed a junction with the bastion of the Coteau de Palais.1 In the Lower Town, on the west side of 1 Bouchette's "Topography...
Page lxvii - Majesty . . ., which at any time or times within or during the continuance of this act, shall be imported or brought into any of the colonies or plantations in America, which now are or hereafter may be in the possession or under the dominion of his Majesty...
Page 32 - River,) receives nearly all the rivers that have their sources in the extensive range of mountains to the northwards, called the Land's Height, that separates the waters falling into Hudson's Bay still further to the north, from those that descend into the Atlantic ; and all those that rise in the ridge which commences on its southern bank, and runs nearly southwesterly until it falls upon Lake Champlain. Of these, the principal ones are...
Page 2 - To commence at a stone boundary on the north bank of the Lake St. Francis, at the cove west of Point-au-Bodet, in the limit between the Township of Lancaster and the Seigneurie of New Longueuil, running along the said limit in the direction of north thirty-four degrees west, to the westernmost angle of the said Seigneurie of New Longueuil; thence along...
Page 32 - French to the six nations) between lake Ontario and lake Erie, it is called Niagara river ; between lake Erie and lake St. Clair, the Detroit ; between lake St. Clair and lake Huron, the river St. Clair ; and between lake Huron and lake Superior, the distance is called the Narrows, or the falls of St. Mary, forming thus an uninterrupted connexion of 2000 miles. Lake Superior, without the aid of any great effort of imagination, may be considered as the inexhaustible spring from whence through unnumbered...
Page 141 - ... fortifications the contents of the area did not exceed 100 acres. A few houses, built close together, in the year 1640, on the site of the Indian village of Hochelaga, was the commencement of the city of Montreal, or, as it was first named, Villemarie ; the situation being well chosen, and possessing many inducements for the colonists to associate themselves for the comforts and convenience of society, it very soon assumed the appearance of being built with some attention to regularity and solidity...
Page 3 - Vaudreuil, running north, twenty-five degrees east, until it strikes the Ottawas river, to ascend the said river into the lake Temiscaming, and from the head of the said lake, by a line drawn due north, until it strikes the boundary line of Hudson's Bay, including all the territory to the westward and southward of the said line to the utmost extent of the country commonly called or known by the name of Canada.

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