Poetic Fragments

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J. Philipson, 1838 - 232 pages

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Page 14 - This was the noblest Roman of them all : All the conspirators, save only he, Did that they did in envy of great Caesar; He only, in a general honest thought, And common good to all, made one of them. His life was gentle; and the elements So mix'd in him that Nature might stand up And say to all the world, This was a man!
Page 54 - If ever," says Keith, in his Evidence of the Truth of the Christian Religion, " there was a city that seemed to bid defiance to any predictions of its fall, that city was Babylon. It was for a long time the most famous city in the Old World. Its walls, which were reckoned among the wonders of the world, appeared rather like the bulwarks of nature than the workmanship of man.
Page 54 - Belus, six hundred feet in height; the artificial hanging gardens, which, piled in successive terraces, towered as high as the walls ; the embankments which restrained the Euphrates ; the hundred brazen gates; the palace built by Nebuchadnezzar, surrounded by three walls eight miles in compass...
Page 39 - A blue sky bends o'er Yarrow vale, Save where that pearly whiteness Is round the rising sun diffused, A tender hazy brightness ; Mild dawn of promise!
Page 54 - If ever there was a city that seemed to bid defiance to any predictions of its fall, that city was Babylon. It was, for a long time, the most famous city in the whole world.* Its walls, which were reckoned among the wonders of the world...
Page 67 - THE eagle hearts of all the North Have left their stormy strand ; The warriors of the world are forth To choose another land ! Again, their long keels sheer the wave, Their broad sheets court the breeze ; Again, the reckless and the brave, Ride lords of weltering seas. Nor swifter from the well-bent bow Can feathered shaft be sped, Than o'er the ocean's flood of snow Their snoring galleys tread.
Page 54 - Yet, while in the plenitude of its power, and, according to the most accurate chronologers, 160 years before the foot of an enemy had entered it, the voice of prophecy pronounced the doom of the mighty and unconquered Babylon. A succession of ages brought it gradually to the dust ; and the gradation of its fall is marked till it sunk at last into utter desolation.
Page 201 - Survey this most * potent hero, whom lately 100,000 knights were eager to serve, -> and whom many nations dreaded, now lying for hours on the naked ground, spoiled and abandoned by every one !
Page 54 - ... 160 years before the foot of an enemy had entered it, the voice of prophecy pronounced the doom of the mighty and unconquered Babylon. A succession of ages brought it gradually to the dust; and the gradation of its fall is marked till it sunk at last into utter desolation. At a time when nothing but magnificence was around Babylon the great, fallen Babylon was delineated exactly as every traveller now describes its ruins.— And the prophecies concerning it may be viewed connectedly from the...
Page 209 - Mary's Church striking the hour; he raised his eyes devoutly to Heaven, and extending his hands, cried out — ' To my lady, the holy Mary, I commend myself, that she by her prayers may reconcile me to her beloved Son.

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