The Scots Magazine, Volume 55

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Sands, Brymer, Murray and Cochran, 1793 - English literature
 

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Page 61 - ... round the pond, to a place which I pointed out to him on the other side, I began to cross the pond with, my kite, which carried me quite over without the least fatigue, and with the greatest pleasure imaginable. I was only obliged occasionally to halt a little in my course, and resist its progress, when it appeared that, by following too quick, I lowered the kite too much ; by doing which occasionally...
Page 538 - I'm sure thou hast been a merciful master to him. Alas! said the mourner, I thought so when he was alive ; but now that he is dead, I think otherwise. I fear the weight of myself and my afflictions together, have been too much for him, they have shortened the poor creature's days, and I fear I have them to answer for.
Page 61 - I was drawn along the surface of the water in a very agreeable manner. Having then engaged another boy to carry my clothes round the pond, to a place which I pointed out to him on the other side, I began to cross the pond with my kite, which carried me quite over without the least fatigue and with the greatest pleasure imaginable.
Page 116 - Majesty has taken the necessary steps to maintain the honour of his crown and to vindicate the rights of his people ; and His...
Page 19 - ... teeth to receive them : when they clap their jaws together it causes a surprising noise, like that which is made by forcing a heavy plank with violence upon the ground, and may be heard at a great distance.
Page 317 - It is fit to take some notice of the various terrors being held out; the numerous crowds which have attended and now attend in and about the hall, out of all reach of hearing what passes in • court ;' and the tumults which, in other places, have shamefully insulted all order and government. Audacious addresses in print dictate to us, from those they call the people, the judgment to be given now, and afterwards upon the conviction. Reasons of policy are urged, from danger to...
Page 19 - ... ascending from his nostrils like smoke. At other times, when swollen to an extent ready to burst, his head and tail lifted up, he spins or twirls round on the surface of the water.
Page 16 - I soon dispatched him by lodging the contents of my gun in his head, and then proceeded to cleanse and prepare my fish for supper...
Page 18 - I laid soundly about his head with my club and beat him off; and after plunging and darting about my boat, he went off on a straight line through the water, seemingly with the rapidity of lightning, and entered the cape of the lagoon. I now employed my time to the very best advantage in paddling close along shore, but could not forbear looking now and then behind me, and presently perceived one of them coming up again.
Page 65 - Scheldt, unless she have also the right to set aside equally all the other treaties between all the powers of Europe, and all the other rights of England, or of her allies.

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