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Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. We will insert your statement. (The statement is as follows:) The report on Schuylkill River at Philadelphia, Pa., is in response to a resolution adopted by the Rivers and Harbors Committee on March 8, 1945. It is also in response to an item in the River and Harbor Act approved March 2, 1945.

Schuylkill River, Pa., flows south 108.4 miles to Fairmont Dam at the head of tidewater in the city of Philadelphia and thence continues south for 8.6 miles within the city and empties into Delaware River just below the Philadelphia Navy Yard. In its headwaters, Schuylkill River flows through coal fields where it picks up large amounts of mine wastes, or culm.

The existing Federal navigation project for Schuylkill River provides for a dredged channel 30 feet deep at mean low water and 400 feet wide from the channel in Delaware River to Twenty-ninth Street, 0.75 mile above the river mouth; thence 30 feet deep and 300 feet wide to Passyunk Avenue Bridge, mile 3.5; thence 26 feet deep and 200 feet wide to Gibson Point, mile 4.5; and thence 22 feet deep and 200 feet wide to University Avenue Bridge, mile 6.2; provided that pending completion of its sewage-treatment works the city of Philadelphia dredge not less than 300,000 cubic yards annually in maintaining the channels above Passyunk Avenue in a condition suitable for navigation and in cooperating with the United States in maintenance of the channel below that bridge.

Commerce on Schuylkill River, which is an important arm of Philadelphia Harbor, averaged 10,385,000 tons annually during the past 10 years and reached a peak of 14,577,000 tons in 1941. Under war conditions commerce declined to 5,526,000 tons in 1943 but this is regarded as a temporary interruption. In spite of a continued scarcity of vessels and inadequate channel depths commerce in 1944 totaled 7,761,000 tons. Of the 1941 commerce, 11,953,000 tons pertained to points between the mouth and Passyunk Avenue, 1,203,000 tons to points thence to the head of the Federal project and 1,421,000 tons to points above.

Among the terminals below Passyunk Avenue are those of three major oil companies and about 82 percent of the 1941 commerce was petroleum and its products. Other principal commodities were coal, sand and gravel, grain, gypsum rock, ores, metals, chemicals and lumber. This commerce was handled by 13,444 vessel trips of which 3,825 were made by vessels drawing 10 feet or more and 229 by ships with drafts of 30 to 34 feet.

The immediate locality served by Schuylkill River lies within metropolitan Philadelphia, which contains a great number and variety of manufacturing and processing plants ranging from small owner-operated enterprises to those conducted by multimillion-dollar corporations. In 1939, the city had 4,300 establishments classified as manufacturing plants, employing approximately 200,000 persons and having an annual output valued at $1,418,000,000. While the refining and distributing of petroleum is the greatest single industry on the Schuylkill, other industries located on, and served by, this waterway include two large chemical plants, a large steam-electric power plant, a large gas plant, a plant processing gypsum, a sand and gravel plant, and a lumber yard.

Local interests desire that the project channel for Schuylkill River be deepened to 35 feet between the channel in Delaware River and Passyunk Avenue and to 25 feet between the head of the existing 26-foot project channel and University Avenue; that a channel 20 feet deep and 200 feet wide be provided for 2,000 feet above University Avenue and thence 15 feet deep and 200 feet wide for an additional 3,000 feet; and that adequate provision be made for maintenance of all the channels.

The Board of Engineers for Rivers and Harbors recommends that the existing project for Schuylkill River, Pa., be modified to provide for a channel 33 feet deep and 400 feet wide from the channel in Delaware River to the mouth of Schuylkill River and in Schuylkill River to Twenty-ninth Street and thence 33 feet deep and 300 feet wide to Passyunk Avenue Bridge, for restoration of the project channel dimensions between Passyunk Avenue Bridge and University Avenue Bridge, and for full maintenance of the project channels from the channel in Delaware River to the University Avenue Bridge.

The improvement is recommended provided (a) that the city of Philadelphia agrees to remove 60,000 cubic yards (place measurement) of material annually from that portion or those portions of the project which the district engineer may designate until such time as adequate municipal sewage treatment works are constructed and placed in effective operation and (6) that local interests

agree to hold and save the United States free from all damages which may result from the recommended work. Cost to United States for additional new work..

$988,000 Cost to United States for restoration of project channel dimensions above Passyunk Avenue Bridge---

1, 036, 000

Total.--

--- 2, 024, 000 Annual cost of maintenance for the new project depths, none in addition to that now required.

For maintenance of project dimensions above Passyunk Avenue Bridge by the United States $330,000 in addition to that now required.

Interest and amortization on the cost of the new work is $39,000 annually.

The annual commerce that would be benefited by the recommended deepening is estimated at 5,430,000 tons of petroleum and its products. The evaluated annual benefits is estimated at $106,900 for elimination of time lost by large tankers awaiting favorable tides. The radio of costs to benefits is 1.0 to 2.74.

Mr. Chairman, on April 12, I described the project recommended for the removal of culm from the Schuylkill. A period of 7 to 10 years will be required to accomplish restoration of the upper river.

The 30-foot project depth below Passyunk Avenue is inadequate for the deeper draft tankers now in general use. A channel 33 feet deep will reasonably accommodate these larger tankers and deeping of the channel to that extent is economically justified.

CAPE MAY CANAL, N. J.

Colonel FERINGA. The next project is for Cape May Canal on the Intracoastal Waterway. That is brought to the attention of this committee because in the last River and Harbor Act there was authorized the improvement of the intracoastal waterway along the Atlantic Ocean to a depth of 12 feet, and including a cut-off channel from the Atlantic Ocean, or the inland waterway on the Atlantic side, to Delaware Bay.

The need for this cut-off channel was so great that the Navy advanced some of its wartime funds to the Army engineers and requested that that channel be provided without delay. That has been done. However, inasmuch as it was done by the Navy, the full term of local cooperation which was required by the last act has not been met.

Local interests did provide the lands as required in the amount, I think, of $99,000, but they did not meet the other condition of local cooperation which required that the bridges would be provided and maintained by local interests.

So the Navy Department built one temporary bridge at this location, the Bayshore Road, one temporary highway bridge, another temporary highway bridge at the Seashore Road, and a temporary railroad bridge for the Pennsylvania-Reading system.

Now, the Navy has abandoned its establishments. It no longer has a need of maintaining this channel, and it is anxious that the Engineer Department, in accordance with normal custom, undertake the condition of maintenance.

Our Department cannot do so because Congress has stated that this project is authorized only providing that the conditions of local cooperation will be met. We therefore recommend, in order that that waterway, which is very greatly used, for instance, for the period of May 1944 to March 1916, inclusive, 12,383 vessel transits were made consisting of 6,583 recreational craft, 1,890 fishing craft, 120 towed barges, 401 tugs, 3,264 Government craft, 125 miscellaneous craft, so the waterway is being used be maintained.

We can do so provided an item is placed in the bill as follows: New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway; pending fulfillment of the conditions of local cooperation for this project as authorized by the River and Harbor Act of March 2, 1945, appropriations heretofore or hereafter made for maintenance and improvement of rivers and harbors may be used for a period of not to exceed five years for maintenance of the canal from Cape May Harbor to Delaware Bay constructed as an emergency wartime project with Navy Department funds, including the cost of maintaining the temporary railroad and Seashore Highway bridges over said canal.

We do not recommend that we maintain the other highway bridge because it is now being maintained by the State and should continue to be so maintained.

Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. I gather that the authorization was made, that you will maintain this project out of maintenance funds.

Colonel FERINGA. Yes, sir.

Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. Now being provided, or that will be provided by Congress?

Colonel FERINGA. That is right, sir.
Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. So you are not asking for any

additional funds.

Colonel FERINGA. No additional funds for new work.
Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. Is there any objection to the project?

Colonel FERINGA. No, sir. The Navy wants it. I had informal conversations with the Bureau of the Budget and although I spoke with people who did not have the authority of the Director of the Budget to speak, they indicated they would be in favor thereof and asked us to send it up to them. That has been done.

Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. The governor is for it?
Colonel FERINGA. Yes, sir; the governor is for it.

This is not a type report that would go to the Board for Rivers and Harbors. It just takes care of a project already constructed as a wartime emergency and now to be maintained.

Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. We will insert your statement at this point, now.

(The statement is as follows:)

CAPE MAY CANAL (NEW JERSEY INTRACOASTAL WATERWAY) The next item pertains to the matter of authority for assumption of maintenance costs with river and harbor funds for the Cape May Canal, a section of the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway recommended in H. R. No. 133 (76th Cong., 1st sess.), and authorized in the River and Harbor Act of March 2, 1945, subject to certain items of local cooperation set forth in that document.

The Cape May Canal was provided as a war measure in 1942 by the Corps of Engineers at the request of the Navy Department. Construction funds were made available by the Navy Department after due clearance with the Bureau of the Budget and to date maintenance of the canal has also been carried forward by the Corps of Engineers at the request of the Navy Department on a reimbursable basis. The Cape May Canal extends from Delaware Bay, above Cape May Point, to Cape May Harbor, which is connected with the Atlantic Ocean via Cold Spring Inlet.

The Cape May Canal improvement opened to traffic in December 1942 consists of a canal 12 feet deep and 100 feet wide across Cape May County as described above, a distance of 3.7 miles; two parallel stone jetties at the Delaware Bay entrance; two temporary highway drawbridges (one on Seashore Road and the other on New Jersey Highway 4) and a temporary railroad bridge at the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Railroad line.

For the period May 1944 to March 1946, inclusive, 12,383 vessel transits were made consisting of 6,583 recreational craft, 1,890 fishing craft, 120 towed barges, 401 tugs, 3,265 Government craft, and 125 miscellaneous craft. The cargo ton

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nage during this period aggregated 34,104 tons. For the 9-month period ending March 31, 1946, 2,654 vessel transits were made.

The Cape May area is a popular resort area and among the finest seashore resorts of the Atlantic coast are those located along the New Jersey shore to the north. Thousands of privately owned recreational craft are engaged in pleasure boating and sport fishing in this area as well as a large number of boats engaged in commercial fishing.

Since the Navy Department's Cape May base has been disestablished the Navy Department desires to be relieved of the responsibility of the continued maintenance of the Cape May Canal.

As authorized in the River and Harbor Act approved March 2, 1945, the following local cooperation was specified for the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway project: The State of New Jersey to cede to the United States all right, title, and interest that it has acquired to lands, easements, rights-of-way, and structures other than bridges for the Manasquan-Bayhead Canal; that the State furnish free of cost to the United States all lands, easements, rights-of-way, and spoil-disposal areas required for construction of the Cape May Canal and for improvement of the proposed waterway and for their subsequent maintenance; that local interests provide, maintain, and operate suitable bridges over the waterway; that the State donate to the United States the navigation items in use on the present New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway, and that the State hold and save the United States and its agents free from any claims for damage resulting from the improvement.

Insofar as the Cape May Canal project is concerned, which has been provided as a war measure, the only local cooperation conditions that have been complied with to date have been a contribution by the State in the amount of $99,000 for payment of right-of-way costs and the assumption of the maintenance cost of one of the temporary highway bridges (New Jersey Highway 4 near Cape May Harbor). All other maintenance costs including the maintenance of the temporary railroad bridge and the remaining temporary highway bridge have been assumed by Navy funds. Federal new work costs_

$1, 824, 940. 00 Maintenance costs--

269, 837. 46

Total_

2,094, 777. 46 Estimated annual maintenance costs-

92, 000.00 While the Cape May Canal project was provided as a war measure it remains actively in use by commercial vessels, recreational and fishing craft, and Government vessels as indicated by the vessel transits and tonnage which I have cited above. For vessels plying between Delaware Bay and the upper Jersey coast a saving in sailing distance of about 3 miles results. Further, it obviates the hazardous wave and current conditions off of Cape May Point which are dangerous to light-draft craft. Maintaining the canal in usable condition therefore definitely serves navigation interest and is in the public interest generally.

To date local interests have declined to meet all of the conditions of local cooperation later called for by the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway item authorized by the March 1945 act and since there is no incentive for them to make a further showing in this regard at this time owing to the canal being in operative order, it is suggested that in view of the general need for maintaining the canal in a serviceable condition that favorable consideration be given to the inclusion of an item reading along the following lines :

New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway: pending fulfillment of the conditions of local cooperation for this project as authorized by the River and Harbor Act of March 2, 1945, appropriations heretofore or hereafter made for maintenance and improvement of rivers and harbors may be used for a period of not to exceed 5 years for maintenance of the canal from Cape May Harbor to Delaware Bay constructed as an emergency wartime project with Navy Department funds, including the cost of maintaining the temporary Railroad and Seashore Highway bridges over said canal.

DEVILS SWAMP BARGE CANAL, LA. Colonel FERINGA. The next project, Mr. Chairman, if you will go back mentally for about 2 weeks, is the one the people from Louisiana explained, Devils Swamp, La.

At that time the Board had not yet acted. You, however, allowed us to present it to you with my promise that I would, in turn, state to you when the project was acted favorably upon.

Mr. Pyburn, from Louisiana, was here at the time, and also General Tyler, who had been retained.

Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. I believe they made statetments with the understanding that it would be placed in the record at the point where we actually presented the project.

Colonel FERINGA. I believe that is so, sir. You made the definite statement that you would not consider it unless the Board acted favorably thereon, and I promised that I would let you know of the Board's action, and the Board has acted. I now so do, and the Board has acted favorably. I have my notes here. The project, in brief, will cost $2,000,000.

It is recommended that we deepen the bayou, which is swampy ground, by making a barge channel which in turn will be accessible to high land which is served by railroad and highways, and therefore make available a harbor to a congested portion of the Mississippi River.

It has previously been testified that it was necessary both from the standpoint of furnishing space to load and unload craft, but also for safety of that craft during the periods of flood in the Mississippi River.

Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. I believe it was brought out that it would be quite valuable as a drainage project, also.

Colonel FERINGA. Yes, sir.
Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. That is at Baton Rouge!
Colonel FERINGA. Yes.
Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. We would make that 12 feet?
Colonel FERINGA. Yes, sir.

The city of Baton Rouge is all around here. This would be in the city of Baton Rouge.

Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. And it would furnish sités for numerous industries.

Colonel FERINGA. Yes, sir. It is similar to many of the projects we have heretofore considered in the upper Mississippi and the Missouri Rivers, and also, like many of the small harbors in the Great Lakes.

The cost of the project would be $2,000,000.

Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. As I recall, there is no opposition to this.

Colonel FERINGA. Not at all, sir. Everyone is heart and soul for it.

Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. The Governor is favorable to it?
Colonel FERINGA. Yes, sir.

Mr. PETERSON of Georgia. We will insert your statement at this point, and following that the proceedings of April 15 can be inserted.

(The statement is as follows:)

MISSISSIPPI RIVER, BATON ROUGE, LA., TO THE GULF OF MEXICO-BARGE CHANNEL

THROUGH DEVILS SWAMP

The report on Mississippi River, Baton Rouge, La., to the Gulf of Mexico, Barge Channel through Devils Swamp, is in response to an item in the River and Harbor Act approved March 2, 1945.

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