Travels in New-England and New-York, Volume 1

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Page 2 - Co. of the said district, have deposited in this office the title of a book, the right whereof they claim as proprietors, in the words following, to wit : " Tadeuskund, the Last King of the Lenape. An Historical Tale." In conformity to the Act of the Congress of the United States...
Page 147 - I know not what ideas that lord may entertain of God and nature ; but I know that such abominable principles are equally abhorrent to religion and humanity. What...
Page 147 - Indian scalping-knife — to the cannibal savage, torturing, murdering, roasting, and eating — literally, my Lords, eating the mangled victims of his barbarous battles ! Such horrible notions shock every precept of religion, divine or natural, and every generous feeling of humanity. And, my Lords, they shock every sentiment of honor; they shock me as a lover of honorable war, and a detester of murderous barbarity. These abominable principles, and this more abominable avowal of them, demand the...
Page 137 - Name of the Council Established at Plymouth in the County of Devon, for the Planting, Ruling, Ordering and Governing of New England in America...
Page 152 - For arts like these preferr'd, admir'd, caress'd, They first invade your table, then your breast ; 'Explore your secrets with insidious art, Watch the weak hour, and ransack all the heart; Then soon your ill-placed confidence repay, Commence your lords, and govern or betray.
Page 314 - Few are born and educated to brighter hopes than those cherished by his children. None, within the limits of my information, have seen those hopes, prematurely declining, set in deeper darkness. For a considerable time no American possessed a higher or more extensive reputation ; no American, who reads this detail, will regard him with envy.
Page 79 - Thou crownest the year with thy goodness ; and thy paths drop fatness. They drop upon the pastures of the wilderness : and the little hills rejoice on every side. The pastures are clothed with flocks ; the valleys also are covered over with corn ; they shout for joy, they also sing.
Page 506 - Boston are characteristically distinguished by a lively imagination ; an ardour easily kindled ; a sensibility soon felt, and strongly expressed; a character, more resembling that of the Greeks than that of the Romans. They admire, where graver people would only approve ; detest where cooler minds would only dislike ; applaud a performance, where others would listen in silence ; and hiss, where a less susceptible audience would only frown. This character renders them sometimes more, sometimes less,...
Page 412 - The artist must be destitute indeed of talents, who could not engross every heart, as well as every eye, by exhibitions of this husband and father, flying to rescue his wife, her infant, and her nurse, from the approaching horde of savages ; attempting on his horse to select from his flying family the child which he was the least able to spare, and unable to make the selection ; facing in their rear the horde of hell-hounds ; alternately and sternly retreating behind his inestimable charge, and fronting...
Page 159 - I urged, in conversation with several gentlemen of great respectability, firm Whigs, and my intimate friends, the importance, and even the necessity, of a declaration of independence on the part of the colonies, and alleged for this measure the very same arguments which afterward were generally considered as decisive, but found them disposed to give me and my arguments a hostile and contemptuous, instead of a cordial reception. Yet, at...

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