Shakespeare's Tragedy of Julius Caesar

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Harper & brothers, 1892 - 199 pages
 

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Page 41 - tis true, this god did shake ; His coward lips did from their colour fly, And that same eye whose bend doth awe the world Did lose his lustre : I did hear him groan : Ay, and that tongue of his that bade the Romans Mark him and write his speeches in their books, Alas, it cried, 'Give me some drink, Titinius,
Page 85 - tis his will : Let but the commons hear this testament — Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read — And they would go and kiss dead Caesar's wounds And dip their napkins...
Page 32 - I grant I am a woman, but withal A woman that Lord Brutus took to wife; I grant I am a woman, but withal A woman well-reputed, Cato's daughter. Think you I am no stronger than my sex, Being so father'd and so husbanded?
Page 98 - For I can raise no money by vile means: By heaven, I had rather coin my heart, And drop my blood for drachmas, than to wring From the hard hands of peasants their vile trash By any indirection: I did send To you for gold to pay my legions, Which you denied me: was that done like Cassius?
Page 80 - Woe to the hand that shed this costly blood ! Over thy wounds now do I prophesy (Which like dumb mouths do ope their ruby lips, To beg the voice and utterance of my tongue) A curse shall light upon the limbs of men; Domestic fury and fierce civil strife Shall cumber all the parts of Italy; Blood and destruction shall be so in use, And dreadful objects so familiar, That mothers shall but smile when they behold Their infants quarter'd with the hands of war; All pity chok'd with custom of fell deeds:...
Page 88 - And will, no doubt, with reasons answer you. I come not, friends, to steal away your hearts : I am no orator, as Brutus is ; But, as you know me all, a plain blunt man, That love my friend...
Page 87 - If you have tears, prepare to shed them now. You all do know this mantle : I remember The first time ever Caesar put it on ; 'Twas on a summer's evening, in his tent, That day he overcame the Nervii : Look, in this place ran Cassius...
Page 41 - Dar'st thou, Cassius, now Leap in with me into this angry flood, And swim to yonder point ?" Upon the word, Accoutred as I was, I plunged in, And bade him follow : so, indeed, he did. The torrent roar'd ; and we did buffet it With lusty sinews ; throwing it aside, And stemming it with hearts of controversy. But ere we could arrive the point propos'd, Caesar cried,
Page 97 - Julius bleed for justice' sake ? What villain touched his body, that did stab, And not for justice ? What, shall one of us, That struck the foremost man of all this world, But for supporting robbers, shall we now Contaminate our fingers with base bribes, And sell the mighty space of our large honours For so much trash as may be grasped thus ? I had rather be a dog, and bay the moon, Than such a Roman.
Page 97 - All this ! ay, more : fret till your proud heart break ; Go show your slaves how choleric you are, And make your bondmen tremble. Must I budge ? Must I observe you ? must I stand and crouch Under your testy humour ? By the gods, You shall digest the venom of your spleen, Though it do split you ; for, from this day forth, I '11 use you for my mirth, yea, for my laughter, When you are waspish.

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