Court Life Below Stairs, Or, London Under the Last Georges : 1714-1760, Volume 2

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Page 169 - I give my vote for Mr. Johnson to fill that great and arduous post. And I hereby declare that I make a total surrender of all my rights and privileges in the English language, as a free-born British subject, to the said Mr. Johnson, during the term of his dictatorship.
Page 75 - And not many days after, the younger son gathered all together and took his journey into a far country; and there he wasted his substance with riotous living.
Page 301 - Our inclinations are not in our power, nor should either of us be held answerable to the other because nature has not made us suitable to each other. Tranquil and comfortable society is, however, in our power ; let our intercourse, therefore, be restricted to that...
Page 221 - That respectable body, of which I have the honour of being a member, affords every evening a sight truly English. Twenty or thirty, perhaps, of the first men in the kingdom in point of fashion and fortune, supping at little tables covered with a napkin, in the middle of a coffeeroom, upon a bit of cold meat, or a sandwich, and drinking a glass of punch.
Page 395 - Case now before you ! Such is the evidence in support of this measure — evidence inadequate to prove a debt — impotent to deprive of a civil right — ridiculous to convict of the lowest offence — scandalous if brought forward to support a charge of the highest nature which the law knows — monstrous to ruin the honour, to blast the name of an English Queen...
Page 214 - His dress was a rusty brown morning suit, a pair of old shoes by way of slippers, a little shrivelled wig sticking on the top of his head, and the sleeves of his shirt and the knees of his breeches hanging loose. A considerable crowd of people gathered round, and were not a little struck by this singular appearance.
Page 174 - Masters, but he is so dull that he would only be troublesome — and besides you know I shun authors, and would never have been one myself, if it obliged me to keep such bad company. They are always in earnest, and think their profession serious, and dwell upon trifles, and reverence learning.
Page 191 - ... he appeared in his shirt, with his little black wig on the top of his head, instead of a nightcap, and a poker in his hand, imagining probably that some ruffians were coming to attack him. When he discovered who they were, and was told their errand, he smiled and with great good humour agreed to their proposal. " What, is it you, you dogs? I'll have a frisk with you.
Page 161 - pick them up myself. But I have a servant very clever ; and, ' if they are not to be had at the booksellers, they are not for
Page 302 - I shall be in some degree at least consoled. I retain every sentiment of gratitude for the situation in which I find myself, as Princess of Wales, .enabled by your means to indulge in the free exercise of a virtue dear to my heart — I mean charity. It wiH be my duty, likewise to act upon another motive — that of giving an example of patience and resignation under every trial.

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