Esio Trot

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Puffin Books, 1991 - Children's stories, English - 61 pages
23 Reviews
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Mr. Hoppy is in love with his neighbor, Mrs. Silver; but she is in love with someone else--Alfie, her pet tortoise. With all her attention focused on Alfie, Mrs. Silver doesn't even know Mr. Hoppy is alive. And Mr. Hoppy is too shy to even ask Mrs. Silver over for tea. Then one day Mr. Hoppy comes up with a brilliant idea to get Mrs. Silver's attention. If Mr. Hoppy's plan works, Mrs. Silver will certainly fall in love with him. After all, everyone knows the way to a woman's heart is through her tortoise. [www.amazon.fr]

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - mstrust - LibraryThing

Mr. Hoppy has been in love with the widowed Mrs. Silver for years. He lives in the apartment above hers and grows plants on his balcony, which gives him the excuse to look down and discuss her beloved ... Read full review

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User Review  - bobbybslax - LibraryThing

It was a cute bedtime story and I think it’s improved my fondness for turtles somehow, but the ending isn’t as pleasant as I expected. Marriages shouldn’t be founded on lies. But at least Alfie the Turtle lived/lives a good life. Read full review

Contents

Section 1
5
Section 2
9
Section 3
13
Copyright

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About the author (1991)

Roald (pronounced "Roo-aal") was born in Llandaff, South Wales. He had a relatively uneventful childhood and was educated at Repton School. During World War II he served as a fighter pilot and for a time was stationed in Washington, D.C.. Prompted by an interviewer, he turned an account of one of his war experiences into a short story that was accepted by the Saturday Evening Post, which were eventually collected in Over to You (1946). Dahl's stories are often described as horror tales or fantasies, but neither description does them justice. He has the ability to treat the horrible and ghastly with a light touch, sometimes even with a humorous one. His tales never become merely shocking or gruesome. His purpose is not to shock but to entertain, and much of the entertainment comes from the unusual twists in his plots, rather than from grizzly details. Dahl has also become famous as a writer of children's stories. In some circles, these works have cased great controversy. Critics have charged that Dahl's work is anti-Semitic and degrades women. Nevertheless, his work continues to be read: Charlie and Chocolate Factory (1964) was made into a successful movie, The BFG was made into a movie in July 2017, and his books of rhymes for children continue to be very popular.

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