Abbott's Journal: The Trials at Manchester in 1694

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Chetham society, 1864 - Lancashire Plot, 1689-1694 - 79 pages
 

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Page xx - I am unable to go on with my argument. How helpless, then, must be a poor man who, never having opened his lips in public, is called upon to reply, without a moment's preparation, to the ablest and most experienced advocates in the kingdom, and whose faculties are paralysed by the thought that, if he fails to convince his hearers, he will in a few hours die on a gallows, and leave beggary and infamy to those who are dearest to him...
Page xx - And yet, from mere nervousness, from mere want of practice in addressing large assemblies, I have lost my recollection : I am unable to go on with my argument. How helpless, then, must be a poor man who, never having opened his lips in public, is called upon to reply, without a moment's preparation, to the ablest and most experienced advocates in the kingdom, and whose faculties are...
Page 6 - ... waist; that he should place upon them as much weight of iron as they could bear, and more, so that they should be unable to rise ; that they should have nothing to eat but the worst bread that could be found, and nothing to drink but water taken from the nearest place to the gaol, except running water ; that the day on which they had bread they should not have water, and e contra ; and that they should lie there till they were dead.
Page 14 - The builders of Old Newgate seem to have regarded, in their plan, nothing but the single article of keeping prisoners in safe custody. The rooms and cells were so close as to be almost the constant seats of disease and sources of infection ; to the destruction of multitudes, not only in the prison, but abroad. The City had therefore very good reason for their resolution to build a new gaol ; but it has some manifest errors.
Page 27 - Sheriff', or his certain attorney, executors, administrators or assigns, for which payment to be well and truly made we bind ourselves, and each and every of us in the whole, our and each and every of our heirs, executors and administrators, firmly by these presents, sealed with our seals.
Page 35 - His testimony was confirmed by other infamous emissaries, who received but too much countenance from the government. Blank warrants were issued, and filled up occasionally with such names as the informers suggested. These were delivered to Aaron Smith, solicitor to the treasury, who, with messengers, accompanied Lunt and his associates to Lancashire, under the protection of a party of Dutch horse-guards, commanded by one captain Baker. They were empowered to break open houses, seize papers, and apprehend...

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