Angela: A Novel

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Harper & Brothers, 1848 - English fiction - 498 pages
 

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Page 17 - Where the rude axe with heaved stroke Was never heard the nymphs to daunt, Or fright them from their hallowed haunt. There in close covert by some brook, Where no profaner eye may look, Hide me from day's garish' eye, While the bee with honeyed thigh, That at her flowery work doth sing, And the waters murmuring, With such consort as they keep, Entice the dewy-feathered sleep...
Page 262 - Not to covet nor desire other men's goods ; but to learn and labour truly to get mine own living, and to do my duty in that state of life unto which it shall please God to call me.
Page 483 - Stand then in His great might, With all His strength endued; And take, to arm you for the fight, The panoply of God. 4 From strength to strength go on, Wrestle, and fight, and pray: Tread all the powers of darkness down, And win the well-fought day.
Page 450 - No longer mourn for me when I am dead Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell Give warning to the world that I am fled From this vile world, with vilest worms to dwell : Nay, if you read this line, remember not The hand that writ it ; for I love you so That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot If thinking on me then should make you woe.
Page 449 - It destroys likewise magnanimity and the raising of human nature, for, take an- example of a dog, and mark what a generosity and courage he will put on, when he finds himself maintained by a man, who to him is instead of a god, or melior natura...
Page 320 - Fear not, my worthiest mistress; 'tis a cause In which Heaven's guards shall wait you. O, pursue, Pursue the sacred counsels of your soul, Which urge you on to virtue ; let not danger, Nor the...
Page 5 - But here, instead, soft gales of passion play, And gently stir the heart, thereby to form A quicker sense of joy ; as breezes stray Across the enliven'd skies, and make them still more gay.
Page 10 - The use of this feigned history hath been to give some shadow of satisfaction to the mind of man in those points wherein the nature of things doth deny it, the world being in proportion inferior to the soul : by reason whereof there is, agreeable to the spirit of man, a more ample greatness, a more exact goodness, and a more absolute variety, than can be found in the nature of things.
Page 438 - However they admired some ministers, they all loved him ; and saw exemplified in him that wisdom which is from above, — which is first pure, then peaceable, gentle and easy to be entreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, and without hypocrisy.
Page 438 - That time of year thou mayst in me behold When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, Bare ruin'd choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. In me thou see'st the twilight of such day As after sunset fadeth in the west, Which by and by black night doth take away, Death's second self, that seals up all in rest.

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