History of the Literature of Ancient Greece: To the Period of Isocrates

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Robert Baldwin, 1847 - Greek literature - 530 pages
 

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Contents

The Theogony
87
The Great Eoiae the Catalogues of Women the Melampodia the JEgi
95
CHAPTER X
104
Poetry
125
Epigrams in elegiac form their Object and Character Simonides as a Composer of Epigrams
126
IAMBIC POETRY J 1 Striking contrast of the Iambic and other contemporaneous Poetry
128
poetry
143
Kinds of the Fable named after different races and cities
144
lvsop his Life and the Character of his Fables
145
Batrachomyomachia
147
CHAPTER XII
148
Founders of Greek Music Terpander his descent and date
149
Terpanders invention of the sevenstringed Cithara
151
Musical scales and styles
152
Nomes of Terpander for singing to the Cithara their rhythmical form
154
Olympus descended from an ancient Phrygian family of fluteplayers
156
His influence confined to music
158
Thaletas his age
159
His connexion with ancient Cretan worships Paeans and hyporchemes of Thaletas
160
Musicians of the succeeding periodClonas Hierax Xenodamus Xeno critus Polymnestus Sacadas
161
State of Greek Music at this period
163
CHAPTER XIII
164
Life and Political Acts of Alca?us
166
Their connexion with his Poetry
167
The other subjects of his Poems
168
Their metrical form
170
Life and moral character of Sappho
172
Her Erotic Poetry to Phaon
174
Poems of Sappho to women
176
Hyunenseals of Sappho
178
Followers of Sappho D imophila Erinna
179
Life of Anacreon
180
His Poems to the youths at the Court of Polycrates
182
His Lovesongs to Hetasra
183
Character of his versification
185
Comparison of the later Anacreontics
186
16 Scolia occasions on which they were sung and their subjects
187
Scolia of Hybrias and Callistratus
189
CHAPTER XIV
190
CHAPTER XV
216
CHAPTER XVI
229
An Orphic literature arises after the destruction of the Pythagorean
235
The Ionians give the main impulse tendency of philosophical speculation
238
CHAPTER XVIII
258
Charon his chronicles of general and special history
264
Its leading ideas
266
Defects and excellencies of his historical researches
272

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Page 232 - All the Greek religious poetry treating of death and the world beyond the grave refers to the deities whose influence was supposed to be exercised in the dark region at the centre of the earth, and who were thought to have little connexion with the political and social relations of human life.
Page 296 - This satyric drama was not a comedy, but (as an ancient author aptly describes it) a playful tragedy. § Its subjects were taken from the same class of adventures of Bacchus and the heroes, as tragedy; but they were so treated in connexion with rude objects of outward nature, that the presence and participation of rustic, * fTftlTtll' f According to the verse : ' I :-,/';.•••: /tu aari>.iui Z
Page 246 - Fire lives the death of earth, and air lives the death of fire ; water lives the death of air, earth that of water.
Page 223 - Or it might be deferred until after the victor's solemn return to his native city, where it was sometimes repeated, in following years, in commemoration of his success. A celebration of this kind always had a religious character, it often began with a procession to an altar or temple, in the place of the games or in the native city ; a sacrifice, followed by a banquet, was then offered at the temple, or in the house of the victor ; and the whole solemnity concluded with the merry and boisterous revel...
Page 117 - Miiller, quoting a fragment of Mimnermus's elegy ' Nanno,' says that he was one of the colonists of Smyrna who came from Colophon, and whose ancestors at a still earlier period came from the Nelean Pylos. To the reduction of Smyrna to Halyattes, he ascribes the melancholy character of his poems.
Page 19 - Thammuz came next behind, Whose annual wound in Lebanon allured The Syrian damsels to lament his fate In amorous ditties, all a summer's day ; While smooth Adonis from his native rock Ran purple to the sea, supposed with blood Of Thammuz yearly wounded...
Page 264 - I write these things as they seem to me to be true ; for the stories of the Greeks are many and ridiculous, as it seems to me.
Page 467 - The formation of an artificial prose style is due entirely to the Sophists, and although they did not at first proceed according to a right method, they may be considered as having laid a foundation for the polished diction of Plato and Demosthenes.
Page 300 - Bacchic festivals, were an indispensable accompaniment to tragedy. They not only concealed the individual features of well-known actors, and enabled the spectators entirely to forget the performer in his part, but gave to his whole aspect that ideal character which the tragedy of antiquity demanded.
Page 233 - Herod., ii. 81) were annexed, was the Chthonian deity Dionysus Zagreus, closely connected with Demeter and Cora, who was the personified expression, not only of the most rapturous pleasure, but also of a deep sorrow for the miseries of human life.

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