Gesta Romanorum: Or, Entertaining Moral Stories ... Translated from the Latin, with Preliminary Observations and Copious Notes, Volume 1

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Wynnard Hooper
 

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Page 377 - To clear this doubt, to know the world by sight, To find if books, or swains, report it right, (For yet by swains alone the world he knew, Whose feet came wandering o'er the nightly dew...
Page 381 - Twas there a vice, and seem'da madness here : Detesting that, and pitying this, he goes, Lost and confounded with the various shows. Now night's dim shades again involve the sky, Again the wanderers want a place to lie, Again they search, and find a lodging nigh : The soil...
Page 375 - Here we discover those features of chivalry, so admirably ridiculed by Cervantes. But, in times of oppression, when every one followed " the simple plan, That he may take who has the power, And he may keep who can...
Page 356 - The quality of mercy is not strained, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven Upon the place beneath. It is twice blessed: It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes...
Page 383 - Celestial odours breathe through purpled air ; And wings, whose colours glitter'd on the day, Wide at his back their gradual plumes display. The form ethereal bursts upon his sight, And moves in all the majesty of light.
Page 382 - Without a vain, without a grudging heart, To him who gives us all, I yield a part ; From him you come, for him accept it here, A frank and sober, more than costly cheer.
Page 147 - Once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more; Or close the wall up with our English dead ! In peace, there's nothing so becomes a man, As modest stillness, and humility : But when the blast of war blows in our ears, Then imitate the action of the tiger...
Page 385 - Long had our pious friend in virtue trod, But now the child half- weaned his heart from God ; (Child of his age) for him he liv'd in pain, And measur'd back his steps to earth again. To what excesses had his dotage run ? But God, to save the father, took the son. To all, but thee, in fits he seem'd to go, (And 'twas my ministry to deal the blow,) The poor fond...
Page 381 - In one so rich, a life so poor and rude ; And why should such...
Page 379 - As one who spies a serpent in his way, Glistening and basking in the summer ray, Disorder'd stops to shun the danger near, Then walks with...

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