Handbook of Practical Logic and Automated Reasoning

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 12, 2009 - Computers - 681 pages
This book meets the demand for a self-contained and broad-based account of the concepts, the machinery and the use of automated reasoning. The mathematical logic foundations are described in conjunction with practical application, all with the minimum of prerequisites. The approach is constructive, concrete and algorithmic: a key feature is that methods are described with reference to actual implementations (for which code is supplied) that readers can use, modify and experiment with. This book is ideally suited for those seeking a one-stop source for the general area of automated reasoning. It can be used as a reference, or as a place to learn the fundamentals, either in conjunction with advanced courses or for self study.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Propositional logic
25
Firstorder logic
118
Equality
235
Decidable problems
308
Interactive theorem proving
464
Limitations
526
Mathematical background
593
OCaml made light of
603
Parsing and printing of formulas
623
References
631
Index
668
Copyright

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About the author (2009)

John Harrison is a Principal Engineer at the Intel Corporation in Portland, Oregon. He specialises in formal verification, automated theorem proving, floating-point arithmetic and mathematical algorithms.

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