Eastern Europe: An Introduction to the People, Lands, and Culture, Volume 1

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Richard C. Frucht
ABC-CLIO, 2005 - Balkan Peninsula - 928 pages
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"Eastern Europe: An Introduction to the People, Lands, and Culture" sheds light on modern-day life in the 16 nations comprising Eastern Europe. Going beyond the history and politics already well documented in other works, this unique three-volume series explores the social and cultural aspects of a region often ignored in books and curricula on Western civilization.

The volumes are organized by geographic proximity and commonality in historical development, allowing the countries to be both studied individually and juxtaposed against others in the region. The first volume covers the northern tier of states, the second looks at lands that were once part of the Hapsburg empire, and the third examines the Balkan states. Each chapter profiles a single country--its geography, history, political development, economy, and culture--and gives readers a glimpse of the challenges that lie ahead. Vignettes on various topics of interest illuminate the unique character of each country.

 

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Contents

V
1
VI
61
VII
113
VIII
165
IX
203
X
203
XI
203
XII
203
XIX
529
XX
529
XXI
529
XXII
529
XXIII
529
XXIV
583
XXV
621
XXVI
695

XIII
203
XIV
283
XV
329
XVI
413
XVII
477
XVIII
529
XXVII
735
XXVIII
791
XXIX
839
XXX
893
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Page 23 - An independent Polish State should be erected which should include the territories inhabited by indisputably Polish populations, which should be assured a free and secure access to the sea, and whose political and economic independence and territorial integrity should be guaranteed by international covenant.
Page vii - As international events have proved since the fall of the Berlin Wall and the collapse of the Soviet Union, the world remains a dangerous and unpredictable place.

About the author (2005)

Richard Frucht, PhD, is professor of history at Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, MO.

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