The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D.

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P.F. Collier and Son, 1901 - Hebrides (Scotland)
 

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Page 418 - Whatever withdraws us from the power of our senses ; whatever makes the past, the distant, or the future predominate over the present, advances us in the dignity of thinking beings. Far from me and from my friends be such frigid philosophy, as may conduct us indifferent and unmoved over any ground which has been dignified by wisdom, bravery, or virtue. That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow • warmer among...
Page 140 - I know of no comedy for many years that has so much exhilarated an audience, that has answered so much the great end of comedy — making an audience merry.
Page 364 - Live while you live, the Epicure would say, And seize the pleasures of the present day. Live while you live, the sacred Preacher cries, And give to God each moment as it flies.
Page 105 - I collated such copies as I could procure, and wished for more, but have not found the collectors of these rarities very communicative.
Page 162 - ... the assistance of one of the ablest lawyers in the kingdom ;' and he will read it to him (laughing all the time). He believes he has made this will ; but he did not make it: you, Chambers, made it for him. I trust you have had more conscience than to make him say, ' being of sound understanding ;' ha, ha, ha ! I hope he has left me a legacy. I'd have his will turned into verse, like a ballad.
Page 264 - No man will be a sailor who has contrivance enough to get himself into a jail ; for being in a ship is being in a jail, with the chance of being drowned'.
Page 98 - Edgeware road, and had carried down his books in two returned post-chaises. He said, he believed the farmer's family thought him an odd character, similar to that in which the Spectator appeared to his landlady and her children : he was The Gentleman. Mr. Mickle, the translator of The Lusiad, and I went to visit him at this place a few days afterwards.
Page 50 - Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, he said, was the only book that ever took him out of bed two hours sooner than he wished to rise.
Page 439 - Sir, are you so grossly ignorant of human nature, as not to know that a man may be very sincere in good principles, without having good practice?
Page 91 - But, Sir, in the British Constitution it is surely of importance to keep up a spirit in the people, so as to preserve a balance against the Crown ". JoHNSON : " Sir, I perceive you are a vile Whig. — Why all this childish jealousy of the power of the Crown ? The Crown has not power enough.

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