The Sketcher

Front Cover
W. Blackwood, 1856 - Drawing - 397 pages
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 176 - E'en in our ashes live their wonted fires. For thee, who, mindful of th' unhonour'd dead, Dost in these lines their artless tale relate; If chance, by lonely contemplation led, Some kindred spirit shall inquire thy fate, Haply some hoary-headed swain may say, 'Oft have we seen him at the peep of dawn Brushing with hasty steps the dews away, To meet the sun upon the upland lawn...
Page 155 - The wilderness and the solitary place shall be glad for them; and the desert shall rejoice, and blossom as the rose. It shall blossom abundantly, and rejoice even with joy and singing: the glory of Lebanon shall be given unto it, the excellency of Carmel and Shar'on, they shall see the glory of the LORD, and the excellency of our God.
Page 140 - The budding twigs spread out their fan, To catch the breezy air ; And I must think, do all I can, That there was pleasure there.
Page 294 - It ceased ; yet still the sails made on A pleasant noise till noon, A noise like of a hidden brook In the leafy month of June, That to the sleeping woods all night Singeth a quiet tune.
Page 58 - And, as I wake, sweet music breathe Above, about, or underneath, Sent by some spirit to mortals good, Or the unseen Genius of the wood.
Page 306 - Nor do not saw the air too much with your hand, thus: but use all gently: for in the very torrent, tempest, and (as I may say) whirlwind of your passion, you must acquire and beget a temperance, that may give it smoothness.
Page 57 - Where the nibbling flocks do stray; Mountains, on whose barren breast The labouring clouds do often rest; Meadows trim with daisies pied, Shallow brooks, and rivers wide; Towers and battlements it sees Bosomed high in tufted trees, Where perhaps some beauty lies, The cynosure of neighbouring eyes.
Page 57 - ... humble shrub, and bush with frizzled hair implicit : last rose, as in dance, the stately trees, and spread their branches hung with copious fruit, or gemmed their blossoms. With high woods the hills were crowned, with tufts the valleys and each fountain side, with borders long the rivers: that Earth now seemed like to Heaven, a seat where Gods might dwell, or wander with delight, and love to haunt her sacred shades...
Page 242 - Like one, that on a lonesome road Doth walk in fear and dread, And having once turned round walks on, And turns no more his head ; Because he knows, a frightful fiend Doth close behind him tread.
Page 58 - And when the sun begins to fling His flaring beams, me, Goddess, bring To arched walks of twilight groves, And shadows brown that Sylvan loves Of pine, or monumental oak, Where the rude axe with heaved stroke Was never heard the Nymphs to daunt, Or fright them from their hallowed haunt.

Bibliographic information