Organizational Learning: A Theory of Action Perspective

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Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, 1978 - Business & Economics - 344 pages
Organizational Learning II: Theory, Method, and Practice expands and updates the ideas and concepts of the authors' ground-breaking first book. Offering fresh innovations, strategies, and concise explanations of long-held theories, this book includes new alternatives for practitioners and researchers. Argyris and Schon address the four principle questions which cut across the two branches of the field of organizational learning. Why is an organization a learning venue? Are real-world organizations capable of learning? What kinds of learning are desirable? How can organizations develop their capability for desirable kinds of learning? With new examples and the most up-to-date information on the technical aspects of organization and management theory, Argyris and Schon demonstrate how the research and practice of organizational learning can be incorporated in today's business environment.

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Contents

Introduction
1
A Framework for Organizational Learning
7
What Facilitates or Inhibits Organizational Learning?
30
Copyright

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About the author (1978)

Chris Argyris was born in 1923. He holds an A.B in psychology from Clark University, an M.A. in psychology and economics from Kansas University, and a Ph.D in organizational behavior from Cornell University. He has taught at Yale University and at Harvard, where he currently is the James Bryand Conent professor in the graduate schools of business administration and education. Argyris has written more than 20 books that aspire to enable readers to create organizations and deal with management and the changing face of the corporate world. Organizational Learning II : Theory, Method and Practice, Overcoming Organizational Defenses, and Integrating the Individual and the Organization are a few of his more notable titles.

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