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Him, too, shall virtue mouin, whose muse begot
“No line which dying he could wish to blot;"
The master-spirit, who has left behind
An universal debtor in mankind !
Then, had ye seen him heave the generous sigh,
Where Anguish groaned, and Want retired to die;
Seen how his glance in gentlest pity fell,
To soothe those pangs

his
pen

could draw so well ;
Or, where the circle closed around the fire,
Watched the kind husband, and th' indulgent sire;
Warm from your hearts would flow the fond regard, -
Ye'd love the Christian, as ye prize the bard.
Ev'n when he wandered on a foreign shore,
To seek that health which must return no more ;
Ev'n then from that worn frame no groan was wrung,
No fretful murmur faltered on his tongue ;
But one fond wish his native land to reach,
And fix his dying eyes on that loved beach ;
The land his childhood roamed, his manhood prized,
The scenes his genius has immortalised!

J. H. J.

[graphic]

Hollar, ic

SIJAMES'S PALACE and part of the CITY of WESTMINSTER,
Taken from the

Noside of Pall Mall.
as they appearut

about the Year 1660.

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121

PALL MALL.

FORMER STATE OF PALL MALL. -SIR THOMAS WYATT.-MURDER OF

THYNNE.—CHARLES THE SECOND'S MISTRESSES. --BEAU FIELDING'S STRANGE ADVENTURE. SCHOMBERG HOUSE. STAR AND GARTER. -DUKE OF BUCKINGHAM'S RESIDENCE.-CARLTON HOUSE.

ABOUT the year 1660, the tract of ground on which Pall Mall, St. James's Square, and Piccadilly now stand, consisted of open fields; St. James's · Street alone being partially built. The wall of St. James's Park ran along the site of the houses on the south side of Pall Mall, and the only buildings to be seen west of Charing Cross were a small church, the name of which is not remembered, -the conduit, a small Gothic building, which stood nearly on the site of St. James's Square,-and a house of public refreshment. The latter building was probably the tavern, called the “ Old Pall Mall," at which Pepys informs us that he occasionally supped. Anderson, who wrote in the middle of the last century, observes, “I have met with several old persons

in

my younger days, who remembered when there was but one single house (a cake-house) between the. Mews Gate at Charing Cross and St. James's Palace Gate, where now stand the stately piles of St. James's Square, Pall Mall, and other

fine streets.” The tract of ground on which Pall Mall now stands, was apparently the meadow, “always green,” to which Le Serre alludes in his “ Entrée Royale,” “Near the avenues of the palace,” he says, “ is a large meadow, always green, in which the ladies walk in summer. Its great gate has a long street in front, reaching nearly to the fields. The palace itself is built of brick, very ancient, with a flat leaden roof, and is surrounded at top by crenelles."

It was along the site of the present Pall Mall that Sir Thomas Wyatt marched his troops in his rash attempt on London in 1554. The Earl of Pembroke, who advanced to oppose him at the head of the royal forces, planted his artillery on the high ground, where Hay Hill and Piccadilly now stand, when a piece of the Queen's ordnance, we are told, slew three of Wyatt's followers in a rank, and after carrying off their heads, passed through the wall into the Park. Stowe, in his brief narrative of the insurrection, affords us an interesting account of the locality of this part of London in the middle of the sixteenth century, “The same night, (February 6th) about five of the clock, a trumpeter went about and warned all horsemen and men of arms to be at St. James's Field, and all footmen to be there by six of the clock on the next morning. The Queen's scout, upon his return to the Court, declared Wyatt's being at Brentford, which sudden news made all the Court wonderfully afraid. Drums went through London at four of the clock in the

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