Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship: A Novel, Volume 2

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Oliver & Boyd, 1824 - 294 pages
 

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Contents

I
3
II
14
III
25
IV
29
V
36
VI
42
VII
46
VIII
49
XXI
133
XXII
135
XXIII
142
XXIV
148
XXV
155
XXVI
163
XXVII
168
XXVIII
176

IX
54
X
58
XI
62
XII
67
XIII
70
XIV
76
XV
81
XVI
90
XVII
106
XVIII
111
XIX
121
XX
127
XXIX
182
XXX
187
XXXI
190
XXXII
197
XXXIII
202
XXXIV
210
XXXV
219
XXXVI
222
XXXVII
230
XXXVIII
257
XXXIX
259

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Page 171 - I'll leave you till night: you are welcome to Elsinore. Ros. Good my lord ! [Exeunt Rosencrantz and Guildenstern. Ham. Ay, so, God be wi' you : — Now I am alone. O, what a rogue and peasant slave am I ! Is it not monstrous, that this player here, But in a fiction, in a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his own conceit, That, from her working, all his visage wann'd ; Tears in his eyes, distraction in's aspect, A broken voice, and his whole function suiting With forms to his conceit ?...
Page 171 - Is it not monstrous that this player here, But in a fiction, in a dream of passion, Could force his soul so to his own conceit That from her working all his visage wann'd, Tears in his eyes, distraction in 's aspect, A broken voice, and his whole function suiting With forms to his conceit?
Page 72 - He is now poor in goods and favour, and a stranger in the scene which from youth he had looked upon as his inheritance. His temper here assumes its first mournful tinge. He feels that now he is not more, that he is less, than a private nobleman; he offers himself as the servant of every one; he is not courteous and condescending, he is needy and degraded.
Page 74 - The time is out of joint: O cursed spite, That ever I was born to set it right! In these words, I imagine, will be found the key to Hamlet's whole procedure. To me it is clear that Shakespeare...
Page 88 - For it is the property of crime to extend its mischief over innocence, as it is of virtue to extend its blessings over many that deserve them not ; while frequently the author of the one or of the other is not punished or rewarded at all. Here in this play of ours, how strange ! The Pit of darkness sends its spirit and demands revenge ; in vain ! All circumstances tend one way, and hurry to revenge ; in vain ! Neither earthly nor infernal thing may bring about what is reserved for Fate alone. The...
Page 131 - among thousands one woman saved ; that still is something: among thousands one honest man discovered ; this is not to be refused. Do you know then what you promise ?" " I know it," answered Wilhelm with a smile, and holding out his hand. " I accept it then," said she, and made a movement with her right hand, as if meaning to take hold of his: but instantly she darted it into her pocket, pulled out her dagger quick as lightning, and scored with the edge and point of it across his hand. He hastily...
Page 199 - Angels and ministers of grace defend us! Be thou a spirit of health or goblin damn'd, Bring with thee airs from heaven or blasts from hell, Be thy intents wicked or charitable, Thou comest in such a questionable shape That I will speak to thee: I'll call thee Hamlet, King, father, royal Dane: O, answer me!
Page 137 - Men are so inclined to content themselves with what is commonest; the spirit and the senses so easily grow dead to the impressions of the beautiful and perfect, that every one should study, by all methods, to nourish in his mind the faculty of feeling these things.
Page 328 - Man's highest merit always is as much as possible to rule external circumstances, and as little as possible to let himself be ruled by them.
Page 314 - I observed that my present condition of mind had formerly been known to me ; only I had never felt it in such strength ; I had never held it fast, never made it mine. I believe, indeed, every human soul at intervals feels something of it.

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