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VIEW OF THE WEYERHAEUSER TIMBER Co.'s PLANT SHOWING FOUR STEAMSHIPS LOADING AT THE WHARF.

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PIERS, WHARVES, AND DOCKS

There are 23 wharves in Everett Harbor, 12 being located on Port Gardner Bay on deep water, 5 on the bay side above Port Gardner Bay, and 6 on the Snohomish River. Of the wharves on Port Gardner Bay, three are used for public transportation purposes, three for the receipt of petroleum products, one for the receipt and canning of fish, two for lumber and logs, two are used in connection with the operations of a pulp mill, and one for the mooring of towboats.

Depths of water in the harbor vary from 0 to 43 feet at mean lower low water, he shallow depths being at the facilities located on the bay side and Snohomish River areas.

The wharf of the Clark-Nickerson Mill Co. is of bulkhead and solid fill construction, all the others on Port Gardner Bay being open pile structures with timber decks. The Oriental dock is the largest in the port, having 1,400 feet of berthing space and depths of water alongside ranging from 12 to 40 feet. This dock is operated as a terminal for overseas, intercoastal, and coastwise business, having a one-story transit shed 820 feet long and 144 feet wide, and is used for the handling of freight in transit and, to some extent, for storage purposes. Tractors and trailers are available for the handling of cargoes.

South of the Oriental dock is the Washington City dock, also used for public transportation purposes, handling passengers and general cargo. This dock is 900 feet long and 90 feet wide, equipped with a one-story transit shed, having a total of 20,000 square feet, which at the discretion of the operating company may also be used for storage purposes.

Directly south of the Washington City dock is the pier of the Everett Dock & Warehouse Co., 885 feet long and 125 feet wide, equipped with a transit shed having 26,700 square feet of space, which may be procured for storage purposes at the discretion of the operator.

Spur tracks from the Great Northern Railway serve the Everett City Dock & Warehouse Co. and the Oriental dock.

Plant “A” of the Weyerhaeuser Timber Co. is the most southerly terminal development on Port Gardner Bay, being equipped with a wharf which provides 1,250 linear feet of berthing space, having a depth of 35 feet of water alongside. The wharf is used in connection with the operation of the plant.

North of the Oriental dock are three docks operated by oil companies receiving petroleum products, two of which supply oil to small vessels. North of and adjacent to the oil docks are two docks owned and operated by the Soundview Pulp & Paper Co. used in

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connection with their plant. The mills are located on solid fill in the rear of the docks.

All the wharves on the bay side front of the city are of bulkhead and solid fill construction and are located on the tidal flats at lumber mills. The depth of water at these wharves is insufficient to permit vessels of any great draft to approach, hence they are used for the accommodation of lighters only, there being only a depth of 4 and 5 feet at mean lower low water. These plants are served by the Great Northern Railway but the wharves are not provided with spur connections.

Five of the wharves on the Snohomish River on the eastern side of the city are located at lumber mills, and one at the plant of the Everett Pulp & Paper Co. All are used as plant accessories and owing to the shallow depth of water can accommodate only scows and other light draft vessels which move in and out of the river with the tides. Three of these wharves are of bulkhead and solid fill construction and three have pile substructures. The Northern Pacific Railway, the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul & Pacific Railroad, and the Great Northern Railway serve the mills in this area.

The water front at Everett is protected by the city fire department, There are no fireboats in the harbor. Hydrants served by 12-inch mains, in which the pressure is 110 pounds, have been installed in the vicinity of most of the docks.

Detailed descriptions of the various piers, wharves, and docks and their handling facilities are contained in the following table:

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connection with their plant. The mills are located on solid fill in the rear of the docks.

All the wharves on the bay side front of the city are of bulkhead and solid fill construction and are located on the tidal flats at lumber mills. The depth of water at these wharves is insufficient to permit vessels of any great draft to approach, hence they are used for the accommodation of lighters only, there being only a depth of 4 and 5 feet at mean lower low water. These plants are served by the Great Northern Railway but the wharves are not provided with spur connections.

Five of the wharves on the Snohomish River on the eastern side of the city are located at lumber mills, and one at the plant of the Everett Pulp & Paper Co. All are used as plant accessories an owing to the shallow depth

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