Bentley's Miscellany, Volume 3

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Charles Dickens, William Harrison Ainsworth, Albert Smith
Richard Bentley, 1838 - Literature

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Page 463 - My liege, and madam, — to expostulate What majesty should be, what duty is, Why day is day, night night, and time is time, Were nothing but to waste night, day, and time. Therefore, since brevity is the soul of wit, And tediousness the limbs and outward flourishes, I will be brief...
Page 469 - Neither a borrower nor a lender be ; For loan oft loses both itself and friend, And borrowing dulls the edge of husbandry.
Page 467 - Thou wretched, rash, intruding fool, farewell ! I took thee for thy better. Take thy fortune. Thou find'st to be too busy is some danger.
Page 99 - Satan in divers shapes in his lonely perambulations, yet daylight put an end to all these evils ; and he would have passed a pleasant life of it, in despite of the devil and all his works, if his path had not been crossed by a being that causes more perplexity to mortal man than ghosts, goblins, and the whole race of witches put together, and that was — a woman.
Page 262 - Some feelings are to mortals given, With less of earth in them than heaven : And if there be a human tear From passion's dross refined and clear, A tear so limpid and so meek, It would not stain an angel's cheek, 'Tis that which pious fathers shed Upon a duteous daughter's head...
Page 407 - They'll fill your homes with care and grief, and clothe your backs with tatters ; They'll fill your hearts with evil thoughts ; but never mind ! — what matters ? "Though virtue sink, and reason fail, and social ties dissever, I'll be your friend in hour of need, and find you homes for ever...
Page 464 - tis, 'tis true : a foolish figure ; But farewell it, for I will use no art. Mad let us grant him then : and now remains, That we find out the cause of this effect ; Or, rather say, the cause of this defect ; For this effect, defective, comes by cause : Thus it remains, and the remainder thus.
Page 238 - Come not to me again : but say to Athens, Timon hath made his everlasting mansion Upon the beached verge of the salt flood ; Who once a day with his embossed froth The turbulent surge shall cover : thither come, And let my grave-stone be your oracle.
Page 9 - ... the reeking bodies of the cattle, and mingling with the fog, which seemed to rest upon the chimney-tops, hung heavily above. All the pens in the centre of the large area: and as many temporary...
Page 465 - You know, sometimes he walks four hours together, Here in the lobby. Queen. So he does, indeed.

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