The Metropolitan Magazine, Volumes 11-12

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Theodore Foster, 1841
 

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Page 269 - A cutpurse of the empire and the rule, That from a shelf the precious diadem stole, And put it in his pocket! Queen. No more! Ham. A king of shreds and patches, — Enter Ghost. Save me, and hover o'er me with your wings, You heavenly guards!
Page 103 - Whilst Alypius, assisted by the governor of the province, urged, with vigour and diligence, the execution of the work, horrible balls of fire breaking out near the foundations, with frequent and reiterated attacks, rendered the place, from time to time, inaccessible to the scorched and blasted workmen; and the victorious element continuing in this manner obstinately and resolutely bent, as it were, to drive them to a distance, the undertaking was abandoned.
Page 45 - Our sorrow for our sins; and then delights To pardon erring man : Sweet mercy seems Its darling attribute, which limits justice; As if there were degrees in infinite, And infinite would rather want perfection Than punish to extent. Ant. I can forgive A foe; but not a mistress and a friend. Treason is there in its most horrid shape, Where trust is greatest...
Page 45 - Alas ! the love of women ! it is known To be a lovely and a fearful thing ; For all of theirs upon that die is thrown, And if 'tis lost, life hath no more to bring To them but mockeries of the past alone...
Page 286 - Looking merely at his shining qualities and achievements, I admire him as I do a Scipio, a Regulus, a Fabius ; a model of tranquil courage, undeviating probity, and armed with a resoluteness and constancy in the cause of truth and freedom, which rendered him superior to the accidents that control the fate of ordinary men.
Page 286 - ... firmness and constancy of his nature, to combine them into an indissoluble alliance against the schemes of despotism and universal domination of the most powerful monarch in Europe, seconded by the ablest generals, at the head of the bravest and best disciplined armies in the world, and wielding, without check or control, the unlimited resources of his empire.
Page 37 - ... virtue, a dominion which she uniformly abused, which invariably oppressed and impoverished you ; and from the cessation of which you date all your prosperity. It is a measure which goes to degrade the country, by saying it is unworthy to govern itself, and to stultify the Parliament, by saying it is unworthy to governing the country.
Page 17 - I apprehend," says that learned judge, " it is a rule in the construction of statutes, that, in the first instance, the grammatical sense of the words is to be adhered to. If that is contrary to, or inconsistent with, any expressed intention or any declared p"urpose of the statute, or if it would involve any absurdity, repugnance, or inconsistency in its different provisions, the grammatical sense must then be modified, extended, or abridged, so far as to avoid such an inconvenience, but no further.
Page 284 - Theirs was a necessity, real or fancied, but a consistent system ; we pretend no necessity ; we have voluntarily abdicated the means of safety, and we wilfully and uselessly continue the causes of danger. The time to have paused was before we heaved from those sons of earth, the mountains which the wisdom or the terrors of our ancestors had heaped upon them ; but we have raised them up and placed them erect — are we prepared to hurl them down and bury them again...
Page 99 - Religion will consist of questions in 1. The Historical Scriptures of the Old Testament to the Death of Solomon. 2. The Gospels of St. Matthew and St. John, and the Acts of the Apostles. Those who offer themselves for examination in Greek will be expected to answer questions on the same parts of the Greek Testament.

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