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areas and a number of national monuments to National Park Service administration in 1933; and the passage of the Historic Sites Act in 1936, with the resultant establishment of a group of national historic sites greatly enlarged the scope of the Service beyond what it was when established in 1916; the Park, Parkway and Recreational Area Study Act of 1936; the conduct of cooperative recreational studies for the Bureau of Reclamation and the Corps of Engineers; and, within the past year, the placing on the Service of responsibility for the administration of recreational facilities at Lake Texoma, in Texas and Oklahoma, and at Shasta and Friant Dams in California, have all meant expanded activities and more complicated organization. The National Park Service is performing these new functions to the best of its ability. Yet there remains a primary responsibility for the integrity of the National Park System, and the Service is determined that no spreading of effort shall detract from the performance of its original duties. The National Park System is an entity which has distinct meaning to millions of Americans. It is important that its identity be maintained; that the basic distinctions in purpose and policy between the system and those other areas which are not a part of it be clearly established and made plain to the public. The work of the Service is being organized with this in view.

OTHER NATIONS SHOW INTEREST

Broadened horizons in appreciation of conservation were recognized in the participation by delegates of many nations to the United Nations Conference for International Organization in memorial cermonies in honor of the late President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. These cermonies were suggested by the Save-the-Redwoods League. Under the majestic redwoods of Cathedral Grove in Muir Woods National Monument, Calif., delegates assembled on May 19 to pay tribute to a great leader, during whose administration not only national park projects but many other conservation objectives were realized. Conference delegates also made pilgrimages to Yosemite, Sequoia, Grand Canyon, and other national parks of the West. They were impressed both with the grandeur of these places and with the governmental policy that assures their preservation for enjoyment. At the termination of the United Nations Conference, seeds of the giant sequoia, the General Sherman Tree, were made available to delegates who desired to take them to their native lands for planting. President Truman, en route to the Conference, spent part of June 22 at Mount Rainier National Park,

Efforts were continued by the National Park Service to stimulate action by the Government of Mexico toward the reserving of an area across the Rio Grande from Big Bend National Park, which would make this an international park. The regional director of region three

visited several Mexican national parks in the spring of 1945 and conferred with Mexican officials regarding the Big Bend International Park and the Coronado International Memorial projects.

Correspondence was carried on with officials at work on surveys and organization plans for national parks and national park authorities for England, Scotland, and Wales; with those of Kruger National Park of South Africa; and with park officials of Brazil.

PUBLIC NEEDS TO KNOW ABOUT POLICIES The National Park Service looks upon itself as the guardian of perhaps the greatest living and testamentary trust ever established. The concept of conservation of a small portion of our land, not for consumption of its natural resources, but for its preservation to minister to the human mind and spirit, because of surpassing grandeur or other special and profound significance, is one almost unique to the United States of America. It is steadily gaining in interest and favor among other nations. Members of our staff returning from service abroad tell us that, even during the war, there has been much thinking and planning along these lines, particularly in Great Britain. Visitors from Latin-American countries report similar interest there.

To meet the responsibilities of its trusteeship satisfactorily, the Service is dependent on congressional support which, in the final analysis, must stem from public support. Both depend primarily upon satisfactory performance of its job and upon evidence that it is meeting the needs of the visiting public. But public approval rests not only on accomplishment but also upon understanding of Service objectives and upon satisfaction with their soundness and with progress toward attaining them.

The Service has been so occupied with carrying out the responsibilities placed on it by law, that it has had scant opportunity to keep the public informed about its fundamental policies. The millions of owners of the system are entitled to authentic information about their estate; why it exists, what it contains, where the units are situated; what principles of management are applied to it and the reasons for them. As travel to the national park system areas increases during the coming years, and more and more Americans enjoy the parks, it is the hope of the National Park Service that it can keep abreast of its obligations to tell the people of the value and the meaning of this great estate.

Information Relating to the National Park System June 30, 1945

Approximate

--- Approximate visitors fiscal jo Areas (classification) State Fond year July 1, vio oar sound 33, o 1945 28,291.07 12,908 163,470 691,338.95 2,312 2) 36,010.38 12,244 49, 753 45,526. 59 131,338 167,580 160,290.33 ,056 124,999 997,486.80 37,801 88, 623 645,084.31 74, 170 196,662 94,892, .92 20,453 Great Smoky 460,882.46 535, 106 756,896 Hawaii-- 173,404.60 381,914 344, 947 Hot Spri 1,019. 13 253,996 209,959 Isle Royale-- 133,838.51 4, 233 5, 177 Kings Canyo 452,984.02 37,455 104,564 Lassen Volcan 101,880.41 19,355 54,937 Mammoth Cave 50, 547. 51 45, 576 90,957 Mesa Verde--- 51,017.87 6,439 18,969 Mount McKinl 1,939,199.04 (1) (1) Mount Rainier- 241,219.92 145,317 284, 813 Olympic- 848,212.30 62,817 73, 978 Platt-- 911.97 201,124 1, 298 Rocky 252,625.87 228,862 392,555 Sequoia-- 385, 100.13 64,582 157,826 Shenandoa 193,472.98 153,944 394,765 Wind Cave 11,718.17 4, 558 10,782 Yellowstone 2,213,206. 55 93,279 269,545 Yosemite- 756,294.65 139,701 295,430 ion---- 94,241.06 44,405 94,463 Total- 11,060,698.50 2,757,945 4,607, 833 Nato historical parks: Abraham Lincoln--- 110. 50 13,491 61,425 Chalmette---- 29. 52 31,631 35, 129 Colonial-- 7,057. 16 204,189 363,305 Morristown- 958. 37 114,965 132,760 Total.---------------------- 8, 155. 55 364,276 592,619 National monuments: Ackia Battleground---------- Mississippi------- - 49. 15 (1) (1) Andrew Johnson-------- Tennessee-- 17.08 14,632 (2) Appomattox Courthouse 968. 25 4, 150 16,015 Arches------------------ 34,089.94 486 1, 581 Aztec Ruins--- 25. 4, 282 7,459 Badlands----- 122,812.46 9,917 91,706 Bandelier------------- New Mexico- 27,048.89 7,044 8, 174 Big Hole Battlefield---------- Montana--- 200. 1,354 (2) Black Canyon of the Gunni- || Colorado------- 12,040. 55 2,681 6,318 Son. Cabrillo *--------------------| California-------- 0. 50 (1) (2) Canyon de Chelly- - 83, 840.00 427 1, 186 Capitol Reef-------- - - - -------------- 33,068.74 (1) (?) , Capulin Mountain - - - - - - - -------------------- 680.42 11, 298 21, 269 Casa Grande---------- - - -------------- 472.50 10,294 11,772 Castillo de San Marcos-- - 18. 51 136,236 172,926 Castle Pinckney------ - 3. 50 (1) Cedar Breaks--- - 6,052. 20 6, 256 7,906 Chaco Canyon-- - 18,039.39 1,463 1,589 Channel Islands- - 1,119.98 (1) (1) Chiricahua---- - 10,529.80 4, 6,878 Colorado---------- - 18, 120. 55 10,333 12,508 Craters of the Moon- - 47, 540.70 2, 8,611 Death Valley----- - 1,850, 565. 20 14,492 41, 802 Devil Postpile- - || California--------------- 798.46 (1) (?) Devils Tower- -| Wyoming--------------- 1, 193.91 5, 165 17, 523 Dinosaur---- - Colorado-Utah---------- 190,801.65 1,835 , 333 El Morro------- New Mexico.------------ 240.00 464 758 Father Millet CroSS- New York-------------- 0.01 (1) Fort Jefferson--- Florida------------------ 86.82 (1) Fort Laramie-- Wyoming--------------- 214.41 2,672 4,371 Fort Matanzas Florida----------------- 18. 34 2,423 19,921 Fort McHenry Maryland--------------- 47.64 297, 263 414, 213 Fort Pulaski 3- Georgia----------------- 5,427.39 (1) (?) Fossil Cycad----------------- South Dakota----------- 320.00 ---------------- (1)

See footnotes at end of table.

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Information Relating to the National Park System June 30, 1945-Continued

Approximate A imate visitors fiscai |APPoona Areas (classification) State Fond year July 1, viour ** 30, 1941–45 National monuments—Con. o Washington Birth- 393.68 10,894 21,751 place. Gila Cliff Dwellings---------- 160.00 (1) 2) Glacier Bay------------------ 2,297,456.27 (1) 1) Grand Canyon 196,051.00 2) Gran Quivira---------------- 450.94 376 1, 289 Great Sand Dunes----------- 36,609. 19 4,753 ,775 Holy Cross------------------- 1,392.00 (1) (2) Homestead.------------------- 162.73 (1) (2) Hovenweep------------------ 299. 34 59 141 Jackson Hole *--------------- 173,064.62 (1) (1) Jewel Cave------------------- 1, 274.56 (1) (2) Joshua Tree------------------ 655,961.33 9,515 17,961 Katmai---------------------- 2,697, 590.00 1 1. Lava Beds------------------- 45,867.56 10,082 19,375 Lehman Caves--------------- 639. 31 | " 928 1,822 Meriwether Lewis----------- 300.00 5,023 8,812 Montezuma Castle----------- 521. 41 3, 5,373 57.00 1) 424. 56 131,314 113,068 2,740.00 134 360.00 69 683. 48 29,667 37,839 38.00 (1) (1) 480.00 1,369 2 Organ Pipe Cactus-- 328, 161.73 63,265 37, 365 Perry's Victory-------------- - 47,097 29, 359 Petrified Forest-------------- 85, 306.00 44, 520 105,721 Pinnacles-------------------- 12,817.77 4, 194 11,863 Pipe Spring------------------ 40.00 546 745 Pipestone-------------------- 115.08 2,828 2,036 Rainbow Bridge------------- 160.00 (1) 2 UlarO---------------------- 53, 669.24 4,810 8, 167 Santa Rosa Island 9, 500.00 456,725 364,527 Scotts Bluff------- 2. 292. 15 25, 604 > Shoshone Cavern- 212. 37 (1) (1) Sitka-------------- 57.00 3,956 ,959 Statue of Liberty 10.38 453, 150 393,677 Sunset Crater---------------- 3,040.00 2,496 o Timpanogos Cave------------ .00 20, 559 12,678 1, 120.00 3,312 y 10.00 7,287 6,481 42.67 3,236 5,389 Verendrye------------------- 253.04 (1) (2) Walnut Canyon-------------- - 1,641.62 5,330 8,067 300.00 (1) 2 138,567.36 41,263 51, 466 45.84 (1) (2) 34,693.03 489 1,658 9. 60 8 51 33,920.75 (1) (2) 9, 285,679.68 1,950, 544 2,217, 565 National military parks: Chickamauga and Chatta- || Georgia and Tennessee-- 8, 146.33 89,903 206, 531 nooga. Fort Donelson.--------------- Tennessee--------------- 102.54 8,861 18, 164 Fredericksburg and Spotsyl- || Virginia----------------- 2,420.15 33, 865 76,518 vania County Battlefields Memorial. Gettysburg------------------- Pennsylvania----------- 2,448. 17 122,302 290,813 Guilford Courthouse--------- North Carolina- - 148.83 19,866 19, 202 Kings Mountain------------- South Carolina- - 4,012.00 10,724 12,628 Moores Creek----------- North Carolina- - 30.00 2,768 3,918 Virginia----- - 1, 310.41 124,684 162,420 Tennessee- - 3,717.59 65, 534 102,315 ----- do----- - 323.86 15, 045 y Mississippi-------------- 1,323.56 y 77,265 -------------------------- 23,983.44 502,742 977,380 National historic sites: Atlanta Campaign------ - Georgia--- - 20.96 (1) (1) Federal Hall Memorial-------| New York-- 0.49 91, 238 (2) Fort Raleigh----------------- North Caroli 16.45 8,950 21, 671

See footnotes at end of table.

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Information Relating to the National Park System June 30, 1945—Continued

Approximate

Approximate visitors fiscal jo: Areas (classification) State Federalland of visitors oxear acres 1944-June 30 average 1945 r 1941–45 National historic sites—Con. Ho: of Franklin D. Roose- | New York-------------- 33.23 (1) (1) Welt. #. Village------------- Pennsylvania----------- 6, 197.00 69,004 44,885 Jefferson National Expansion issouri---------------- 82. 31,321 (2) Memorial. anāSS8S-------------------- Virginia----------------- 1,604.57 4, 546 6,345 o: Philadelphia Custom Pennsylvania----------- 0.7 22,701 13,387 Ouse. Salem Maritime-------------- Massachusetts. -------- 8. 61 4,631 5,573 Vanderbilt Mansion--------- New York-------------- 211.65 11,058 14, 461 8, 176.33 243,449 106,322 183.32 16,728 18, 655 Brices Cross Roads----------- Mississippi-- 1.00 (1) (2) Cowpens--------------------- South Caroli 1.00 (1) (2) Fort Necessity------- Pennsylvania- 2.00 23,834 35,429 Kennesaw Mountain- Georgia.----- 60.00 17,056 14,640 Tupelo--------------- No. 1.00 (1) 1, White Plains----------------- New York--------------|-------------- (1) (1) Total------------------------------------------------ 248.32 57,618 70, 164 National battlefield parks: Richmond Virginia----------------- 684. 44 17,824 (2) National memorials: House where Lincoln died----| District of Columbia---- 0.05 65,082 42,869 Kill Devil Hil --| North Carolina--------- 314.40 8,697 29,991 Lee Mansion- irginia----------------- . 50 230,953 233,619 Lincoln Memo - District of Columbia---- . 61 626, 171 979, 172 Lincoln Museum-------------|----- 0------------------- . 18 101,335 69,269 Mount Rushmore-- South Dakota----------- 1,686. 40 37, 148 126,427 New Echota Marker- eorgia.----------------- . 92 i (?) Thomas Jefferson____ District of Columbia---- 1.20 403,727 (2) Washington Monument------|----- 0------------------- . 37 562,852 651,660 Total----------------------|-- *------------------------ 2,004. 63 2,035,965 2, 133,007 National cemeteries: Antietam *- -| Maryland--------------- 11.36 (1) (1) Battleground- District of Columbia_-__ 1.03 2,700 , 740 Custer Battlefield- Montana 757.84 14,071 26,498 Fort Donelson 5– 15. 34 (1) (1) Fredericksburg 3 12.00 (1) (1) Gettysburg 3-- 15. 55 (1) (1) Poplar Grove 8. 72 (1) (1) Shiloh 5- - - 10.25 (1) (1) Stones Riv 20.09 (1) (i) Vicksburg 5- 119.76 (1) (1) Yorktown 5– 2.91 (1) (1) Total.----------------------|-------------------------- 974.85 16,771 29, 238 National Capital parks: 6 - The park system of the Dis- | District of Columbia, 727,790.36 (1) (1) trict of Columbia. Virginia, and Maryland. Parkways: Blue Ridge-- - North Carolina-Virginia- 38,911. 50 277,018 370, 544 Natchez Tra Tennessee, Alabama, 13,648.87 (1) (1) and Mississippi. . Groß Washington Memo- [Maryland and Virginia - 2,458.68 (1) (1) ria Total---------------------- 55,019.05 277,018 370, 544 Total—National Park Sys- 20, 473,415.15 8, 224, 152 11, 104,672 ena. National recreational area: Boulder Dam---------------- Arizona and Nevada.----| 1,680, 133.33 298,524 442,328

See footnotes at end of table.

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