Minutes of Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers, Volume 164

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Vols. 39-204 (1874/75-1916/17) have a section 3 containing "Abstracts of papers in foreign transactions and periodicals" (title varies); issued separately, 1919-37, as the institution's Engineering abstracts from the current periodical literature of engineering and applied science, published outside the United Kingdom.

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Page 46 - From investigation of results obtained, the following conclusions are established : — (1) That the storm- water discharge from any defined district is directly proportional to the percentage of impermeable area comprised in it. (2) That, subject to a time allowance being added for the entrance of the rain into the system, the discharge of storm-water from underground channels is proportional to the aggregate rainfall during the time of concentration of the water through the conduits, from the extreme...
Page 70 - The pectising substance appears to hasten merely an impending change. Even while fluid, a colloid may alter sensibly, from colourless becoming opalescent ; and while pectous, the degree of hydration may become reduced from internal change. The gradual progress of alteration in the colloid effect by the agency of time is an investigation yet to be entered upon.
Page 70 - The fluid colloid becomes pectous (curdled) and insoluble by contact with certain other substances, without combining with these substances, and often under the influence of time alone. The pectizing substance appears to hasten merely an impending change. Even while fluid, a colloid may alter sensibly, from colorless becoming opalescent ; and while pectous, the degree of hydration may become reduced from internal change.
Page 53 - ... originally intended only for calculations of watershed discharge. The great divergence of the results obtained by the use of this formula is not likely to create surprise when its construction is compared with recent experience. Mr. Emil Kuichling was the first to recognise that the rainfall intensity varies with the extent of the area, and the importance of the time of concentration.
Page 152 - ... many years, and the accumulated organic matter has undergone this long-continued bacterial action that is always taking place in such filters, most of this matter is found to be stable in nature and difficult to oxidize. Undoubtedly a certain portion of it is as stable as humus; in other words, as stable as soil nitrogen which remains year after year at practically the same point unless exhausted by severe cropping.
Page 410 - Engineers, of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, and of the Institution of Naval Architects.
Page 45 - These relationships can be expressed as a formula which is known as the Chezy formula. In it V is the mean velocity in feet per second; R is the hydraulic radius, or area of the stream divided by the wetted perimeter; s is the slope of the hydraulic grade line or, in open channels, the slope of the water surface; C is a coefficient. Since the effects of roughness, velocity, and other factors are only approximate, the value of C is not constant but varies...
Page 47 - Q denote the discharge of storm-water in cubic feet per minute ; t ,, ,, time of concentration in minutes (ie, time of flow through the longest line of sewers in the district plus entrance allowance) ; r ,, ,, total rainfall in inches during t (this can be obtained from curves similar to those given in Fig.
Page 403 - to carry on the work of the Royal College of Science and the Royal School of Mines...
Page 52 - ... is of no great use excepting for "entrance time" computations. In fact, surface slope, which is such an important factor in many of the rules, appears to be included in an attempt to frame a formula from models originally intended only for calculations of watershed discharge. The great divergence of the results obtained by the use of this formula is not likely to create surprise when its construction is compared with recent experience. Mr. Emil Kuichling...

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