Bulletin, Issue 7

Front Cover
The Survey, 1906 - Geology
 

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Page 241 - Chloride of sodium ------ 77.758$ Chloride of magnesium - . - - - 10.878 Sulphate of magnesium ----- 4.737 Sulphate of calcium (gypsum) - - 3.600 Sulphate of potassium ----- 2.465 Carbonate of lime ------ 0.345 Bromide of magnesium ----- 0.217 Total ... . . 100.000? Gypsum is deposited from typical sea water when 80 per cent. of the water has evaporated, whereas common salt is not deposited until the bulk of the water...
Page 270 - Collected by John R. Procter, and stated by him to occur probably below the Corniferous limestone. The exact locality not being known, this statement can not be verified, but, in this area, plastic clays with a very small percentage of lime are not known in Silurian formations. A compact clay, generally of a light, olive-gray color, stained irregularly with ochreous and ferruginous. Quite plastic. Calcines quite hard, to a handsome light brick color. Analysis, sample dried at 212 degrees F.: Regarding...
Page 278 - Cornel ison & Son. The clay is obtained on the road from Waco to Cobb Ferry, about a mile and a half east of the junction of this road with the road from Waco to Bybeetown. The pit is located northwest of the road corners, at which the road across Falling Brook joins the road from Waco to Cobb Ferry. The thickness of the clay bed in the clay pit averages about five feet. The clay overlies the Black Shale. The clay is brought to the shop and put in a ring pit. This ring pit usually consists of a circular...
Page 271 - ... owe these tints to their considerable proportion of iron oxide, which, together with their large proportion of potash renders them unavailable as fire-clays. This very circumstance, however, may fit them for stoneware and for superior kinds of hard-burnt, semi-fused, ornamental pottery in the hands, of skillful workmen and artists.
Page 232 - In place of a maximum of 2.4 per cent. of alkalies, as in good .stoneware clays, the Silurian clays contain from 5 to 5.6 per cent. of potash and soda. In place of a maximum of 3.9 for the total quantity of ferric oxide, lime and magnesia, the Silurian clays contain between 7 and 13 per cent. As far as may be determined from the analyses, these Silurian clays should be almost ideal for the average run of vitrified wares. This is well brought out by the following table, which indicates the range of...
Page 148 - Where less weathered, in the creek, ilk.- rock has a bluish color. On the banks, where more weathered, its color is rusty brown. Some of the layers are sparingly crinoidal, but with crinoid stems or segments of stems of small diameter. The lowest layer of the Brassfield bed includes numerous rounded, black pebbles and grains, possibly phosphatic, varying in size from an eighth to a quarter of an inch; a few equal even as much as an inch in diameter. Immediately below, the top of the Ordovician is...
Page 236 - One of these is calcium sulphate, which, if present only in small quantities, retards the set of the cement. Magnesium carbonate is an undesirable impurity in the unburned mixture, and should form less than 3.5 per cent. of the latter. For use as Portland cements the clays should carry not less than 55 per cent. of silica, and preferably from 60 to 70 per cent. The alumina and ferric oxide calculated together should not amount to more than one-half of the percentage of the silica. The value of the...
Page 227 - From Irvine, along the road an eighth of a mile north of Estill Springs, and an eighth of a mile south of James Harris; Estill county. Geological position: Lulbegrud clay, collected from two to thirteen feet below the massive two-foot layer which forms the base of the Waco formation. This is the middle clay of the Crab Orchard bed. Collected by AF Foerste, 1904. * Analysis, sample air dried: Per cent.
Page 255 - It has been stated that the table of contents of the waters from a mineral spring is but an index of the various geological strata through which its waters have passed and of the mineral bodies with which they have come in contact.
Page 36 - On closer inspection, the faumi of the Brassfield limestone of Ohio, Indiana, and Kentucky appears to differ sufficiently from the fauna of the Clinton limestone of New York to warrant the assumption of the presence of some sort of barrier between these two areas. Whitfieldella Horizon. The fossils listed in the preceding section occur chiefly in the upper part of the Brassfield section, consisting of rather thin layers of limestone interbedded with a little clay.

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