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THE GRADUATED COURSE

OF
TRANSLATION

FROM

ENGLISH INTO FRENCH

PART 1.-JUNIOR COURSE

LONDON : PRINTED BY SPOTTISWOODE AND CO., NEW-STREET SQUARE

AND PARLIAMENT STREET

THE GRADUATED COURSE

OF

TRANSLATION

FROM

ENGLISH INTO FRENCH

PART 1.—THE JUNIOR COURSE
With a VOCABULARY of IDIOMS and DIFFICULTIES

EDITED BY

PROF. CH. CASSAL, LL.D.
UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, LONDON, AND ROYAL NAVAL COLLEGE, GREENWICH

and
PROF. THÉODORE KARCHER, LL.B.
ROYAL MILITARY ACADEMY, WOOLWICH, AND DEPARTMENT OF ARTILLERY STUDIES

Former and Present Examiners in the University of London,

for the Civil Service of India, the Admiralty, &c.

LONDON
LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.

1875
2757. f. 2

All rights reserved

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PREFACE.

Our long and varied experience in our double capacity of Professors and Examiners has taught us the necessity of beginning very early, even with the youngest students, the practice of translating from English into French. The • Exercises' which are given in almost all grammars, and which usually contain nothing but detached and unmeaning sentences, have no interest for the pupils, and leave scarcely any impression on their memory. Hence it comes that so many of them are utterly unable to render into tolerable French the simplest English passage, even after five or six years of study and worry.

In our own classes our custom has invariably been to give our pupils, almost from the beginning, easy but interesting English anecdotes and facts to translate into French. This method answers well as far as we are concerned, and the constant success with which it meets induces us to publish the materials which we have used, both in teaching and examining. They are set in gradual order, the gradation being governed by the difficulties they contain.

Our experience has also shown us the useless, or rather injurious, character of footnotes, not to mention the really hurtful custom which prevails in grammatical · Exercise

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