Salads and Sauces

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F. A. Stokes Company, 1884 - Cooking (Salad dressing) - 297 pages
 

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Contents

I
7
II
15
III
18
IV
34
V
45
VI
277
VII
279
Copyright

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Page 166 - The kingdom of heaven is like to a grain of mustard seed, which a man took, and sowed in his field, which indeed is the least of all seeds, but when it is grown, it is the greatest among herbs, and becometh a tree, so that the birds of the air come and lodge in the branches thereof.
Page 255 - Two large potatoes passed through kitchen sieve Unwonted softness to the salad give. Of mordant mustard add a single spoon ; Distrust the condiment which bites too soon ; But deem it not, thou man of herbs, a fault To add a double quantity of salt. Three times the spoon with oil of Lucca crown, And once with vinegar procured from town.
Page 256 - T would tempt the dying anchorite to eat; Back to the world he'd turn his fleeting soul, And plunge his fingers in the salad bowl. Serenely full, the epicure would say, "Fate cannot harm me, I have dined today.
Page 46 - Take endive — like love it is bitter ; Take beet — for like love it is red ; Crisp leaf of the lettuce shall glitter, And cress from the rivulet's bed : Anchovies foam-born, like the lady Whose beauty has maddened this bard, And olives, from groves that are shady ; And eggs — boil "em hard.
Page 137 - Boil a couple of Eggs for twelve minutes, and put them in a basin of cold water for a few minutes, — the Yolks must be quite cold and hard, or they will not incorporate with the ingredients.
Page 256 - And once with vinegar, procured from town ; True flavour needs it, and your poet begs The pounded yellow of two well-boiled eggs ; Let onion atoms lurk within the bowl, And scarce suspected, animate the whole ; And lastly, on the flavoured compound toss, A magic teaspoon of anchovy sauce : Then though green turtle fail, though venison's tough, And ham and turkey are not boiled enough, Serenely full, the epicure may say — " Fate cannot harm me, — I have dined to-day.
Page 166 - Tree, the name of a tree thus described in the words of the New Testament : " A grain of mustard seed, the least of all seeds ; but when it is grown, it is the greatest among herbs, and becometh a tree, so that the birds of the air come and lodge in the branches thereof" (St. Matthew xiii. 31, 32, etc.) Bible commentators differ greatly as to what was the plant here spoken of ; for although the translation from the Hebrew and Greek has been rendered into the English word Mustard, there is nevertheless...
Page 271 - Study these well, and fancy's flight decline ; If you would have a vivid, vigorous breed, Of every kind, examine well the seed ; Learn to what elements your plants belong, What is their constitution, weak or strong ; Be their physician, careful of their lives, And see that every species daily thrives ; These love much air, these on much earth rely, These, without constant warmth, decay and die ; Supply the wants of each, and they will pay For all your care through each, succeeding day.
Page 55 - ... and luxury in the house. The mattress to lie upon, the chair to sit upon, the table to dine from, food to eat, and fuel to cook it with, are alike derived from it : the ferule to govern the scholar, and the book he studies, both originate here.
Page 223 - Once more upon the waters ! yet once more ! And the waves bound beneath me as a steed That knows his rider. Welcome to their roar! Swift be their guidance, wheresoe'er it lead ! Though the strain'd mast should quiver as a reed.

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