The Education of Boys for Business: Being Practical Suggestions to Parents on the Education of Their Sons for Commercial Life

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G. Philip & Son, 1875 - Boys - 272 pages

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Page 127 - Report, p. 293. suffered our boys to grow up in total ignorance of, sometimes in disgraceful contempt for, every scientific pursuit. In an age which is emphatically the age of science, " 'Mid the mighty march of mind, The steamship, and the railway, and the thoughts that shake mankind...
Page 196 - Writing A sentence slowly dictated once by a few words at a time from the same book, but not from the paragraph read.
Page 196 - A short paragraph from an elementary reading book. Writing. — A sentence from the same book, slowly read once,' and then dictated in single words.
Page 160 - The school premises are healthy, well lighted, warmed, drained, and ventilated, properly furnished, supplied with suitable offices, and contain in the principal school-room and class-rooms at least 80 cubic feet of internal space, and 8 square feet of area, for each child in average attendance.
Page 63 - ... insecurity of his position, and taught by the experience of many falls the danger of relaxing his efforts for one moment. In front of this eager, animated throng stands the master, gaunt, muscular, and time-worn, poorly clad, and plain in manner and speech, but with the dignity of a ruler in his gestures, and the fire of an enthusiast in his eye ; never sitting down, but...
Page 63 - ... enthusiast in his eye; never sitting down, but standing always in some commanding position before the class ; full of movement, vigour, and energy; so thoroughly versed in his author or his subject that he seldom requires to look at the text-book, which is open in his left hand, while in his right he holds the chalk or the pointer, ever ready to illustrate from map or black board, or perhaps flourishes the ancient " taws " with which in former days he used to reduce disorderly new comers to discipline...
Page 128 - ... historico-infinitive, and prolate-infinitive ; of adverbs consecutive, final, causal, temporal, conditional, concessive, comparative ; of relations — never heard of in his own home — epithetic, attributively enthetic, adverbially enthetic, complemental, annexive, circumstantive, predicative, prolative, receptive, proprietive ; of gerundive attractions — to him inattractive ; of gerundives with attributive constructions — upon which he can put no...
Page 127 - I may so phrase it, its raison d'etre, — a considerable number (many would be inclined to say the larger number) leave school at the age of eighteen or nineteen, not only ignorant of history, both ancient and modern, ignorant of geography and chronology, ignorant of every single modern language, ignorant of their own language and often of its mere spelling, ignorant of every single science, ignorant of the merest elements of geometry and mathematics, ignorant of music, ignorant of drawing, profoundly...
Page 65 - SCOTCH SCHOOLS. There are some points in which the schools of Scotland are very remarkable. In the thoroughness with which they teach the intellectual part of reading, they furnish a model worthy of being copied by the world. Not only is the meaning of all the important words in the lesson clearly brought out, but the whole class or family of words, to which the principal word belongs, are introduced, and their signification given. The pupil not only gains...
Page 262 - The eye is much more the expression of all that the teacher is than the best-chosen words can be. The scholars can understand it more quickly than they can understand words, and there is nothing for which the eye is more available than the expression of satisfaction or dissatisfaction with what is seen. The eye is hardly misinterpreted by one who observes its play. In addition, it is the most quick and most silent of messengers. There is no quicker telegraph for the schoolroom, and it is practically...

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