The Vietnam War: An Intimate History

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Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group, Sep 5, 2017 - History - 640 pages
More than forty years have passed since the end of the Vietnam War, but its memory continues to loom large in the national psyche. In this intimate history, Geoffrey C. Ward and Ken Burns have crafted a fresh and insightful account of the long and brutal conflict that reunited Vietnam while dividing the United States as nothing else had since the Civil War. From the Gulf of Tonkin and the Tet Offensive to Hamburger Hill and the fall of Saigon, Ward and Burns trace the conflict that dogged three American presidents and their advisers. But most of the voices that echo from these pages belong to less exalted men and women—those who fought in the war as well as those who fought against it, both victims and victors—willing for the first time to share their memories of Vietnam as it really was. A magisterial tour de force, The Vietnam War is an engrossing history of America’s least-understood conflict.
 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - dasam - LibraryThing

A tough read---there were atrocities and heroes, sages and fools on all sides. If you have done any significant reading/research, you will not learn anything dramatically new here--but the stories and ... Read full review

The Vietnam War: An Intimate History

User Review  - Publishers Weekly

This lavishly illustrated large-format book from frequent collaborators Ward and Burns (The Roosevelts) serves as the companion volume to the eponymous 18-hour, 10-part PBS documentary from Burns and ... Read full review

Contents

RIDING THE TIGER 196119635
51
THE RIVER STYx JANUARY 1934DECEMBER 1965
97
RESOLVE JANUARY 1966JUNE 1967
145
what we DC JULYDECEMBER 1967
201
THINGS FALL APART ANUARYUNE 1938
253
THE HISTORY OF THE world WAY 1969DECEMBER 1970
383
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About the author (2017)

GEOFFREY C. WARD, historian and screenwriter, is the author of nineteen books, including A First-Class Temperament: The Emergence of Franklin Roosevelt, which won the National Book Critics Circle Award, the Francis Parkman Prize, and was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. He has written or cowritten many documentary films, including The War, The Civil War, Baseball, The West, Mark Twain, Not for Ourselves Alone, and Jazz.

KEN BURNS, the producer and director of numerous film series, including Vietnam, The Roosevelts, and The War, founded his own documentary film company, Florentine Films, in 1976. His landmark film The Civil War was the highest-rated series in the history of American public television, and his work has won numerous prizes, including the Emmy and Peabody Awards, and two Academy Award nominations. He lives in Walpole, New Hampshire.

LYNN NOVICK's
previous directing credits include Prohibition, a three part series on the rise, rule, and fall of the 18th Amendment; Frank Lloyd Wright, a two part biography of the architect; and The Tenth Inning, a four hour sequel to Burns's Baseball, which Novick produced. She also produced his 20 hour series, Jazz. She has received Peabody and Emmy awards.

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