An Ecclesiastical History, Ancient and Modern, Form the Birth of Christ, to the Beginning of the Present Century, Volume 4

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Page 319 - Moreover if thy brother shall trespass against thee, go and tell him his fault between thee and him alone ; if he shall hear thee, thou hast gained thy brother. But if he will not hear thee, then take with thee one or two more, that in the mouth of two or three witnesses every word may be established. And if he shall neglect to hear them, tell it unto the church : but if he neglect to hear the church, let him be unto thee as an heathen man and a publican.
Page 295 - We have also a more sure word of prophecy, whereunto ye do well that ye take heed, as unto a light that shineth in a dark place, until the day dawn, and the day-star arise in your hearts; knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation.
Page 105 - As to what appertains to soundness of judgment in matters of faith, we esteem it sufficient that a church acknowledge the scriptures to be the word of God, the perfect and only rule of faith and practice, and own either the doctrinal part of those commonly called the articles of the church of England, or the confession or catechisms, shorter or larger compiled by the assembly at Westminster, or the confession agreed on at the Savoy, to be agreeable to the said rule.
Page 316 - ... arising from such a sense of our infirmities, and of the need we have of Divine help, to be more acceptable to God, than any performances, however specious, which originate in the will of man. From what has been said respecting worship, it follows that the ministry we approve must have its origin from the same source ; for that which is needful for man's own direction, and for his acceptance with God, must be eminently so to enable him to be helpful to others.
Page 210 - Hence arose warm contests and heavy complaints, which engaged the king of Great Britain, and the States General of the United Provinces, to...
Page 325 - I love God," and hateth his brother, he is a liar: for he that loveth not his brother whom he hath seen, how can he love God whom he hath not seen? And this commandment have we from him, that he who loveth God love his brother also.
Page 39 - Hence complaints arose against these institutions of pietism, as if, under a striking appearance of sanctity, they led the people into false notions of religion, and fomented, in those who were of a turbulent and violent character, the seeds and principles of mutiny and sedition.
Page 285 - God endued with a clear and wonderful depth, a discerner of others' spirits, and very much a master of his own. And though the side of his understanding which lay next to the world, and especially the expression of it, might sound uncouth and unfashionable to nice ears, his matter was nevertheless very profound ; and would not only...
Page 320 - Its business is to provide for the subsistence of the poor, and for the education of their offspring : to judge of the sincerity and fitness of persons appearing to be convinced of the religious principles of the society, and desiring to be admitted into membership ;gto excite" due attention to the discharge of religious and moral duty ; and to deal with disorderly members.
Page 130 - That God, from all eternity, determined to bestow salvation on those whom he foresaw would persevere unto the end in their faith in Christ Jesus ; and to inflict everlasting punishments on those who should continue in their unbelief, and resist, unto the end, his divine succours.

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