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FEDERAL FARM BOARD MEMBERS

ALEXANDER LEGGE, Chairman

JAMES C. STONE, Vice Chairman C. B. DENMAN

CHARLES C. TEAGUE SAMUEL R. McKELVIE CARL WILLIAMS WILLIAM F. SCHILLING CHARLES S. WILSON ARTHUR M. HYDE, Secretary of Agriculture, member

ex officio
CHRIS L. CHRISTENSEN, Secretary

New developments in the farmer's efforts to build his own cooperative marketing machinery are briefly related in this publication. Information is given concerning the national sales agencies established by the farmers' cooperatives with the assistance of the Federal Farm Board.

This bulletin deals with the organization and marketing plans of cooperative sales agencies, territories covered, membership, operation and loan policies, and volume of business.

Headquarters of the nationals, branch offices, and member cooperatives are listed. Names and addresses of the seven advisory commodity committees, created under the provisions of the Agricultural Marketing Act, are also included.

Issued by
FEDERAL FARM BOARD
1300 E Street NW., Washington, D. C.

ADDITIONAL COPIES of this Bulletin may be obtained free upon request. Address DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION, FEDERAL FARM BOARD

Washington, D. C.

NITED S.AP-OF AMERICA

FEDERAL FARM BOARD

WASHINGTON, D. C.

Bulletin No. 3

December, 1930

FARMERS BUILD

THEIR

MARKETING MACHINERY

The Agricultural Marketing Act Helps In Developing

Cooperative Program Open To All Growers

GENERAL

More than a million farmers have been aided by the agricultural marketing act. - All farmers, no matter where they live in the United States, may market their crops through the local, regional, terminal, and national cooperative organizations that are being developed in accordance with the provisions of this Federal law.

Seven national agencies have been established by cooperatives with the assistance of the Federal Farm Board. Six of these are sales agencies. Five already are operating, marketing grain, cotton, livestock, wool and mohair, and pecans.

Foundations are being laid for the building of other national marketing organizations wherever they are needed.

There are 12,000 farmer-owned and controlled cooperative associations in the United States, according to estimates in June, 1930. The membership of these associations totals approximately 3,100,000, representing about 2,000,000 farmers. Some producers are members of 2, 3, 4, or 5 organizations, which accounts for the difference between the membership and the number of farmers.

Producers of more than 40 farm crops have been definitely assisted in a practical way by the agricultural marketing act through their cooperatives. The new law, passed in June, 1929, has intensified the farmer's interest in cooperative marketing. Farmers are gradu

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