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Colonel Dixon. No, sir; there is no protected harbor there now for oceangoing ships. They carry the materials and the goods to be shipped out on small lighters for reloading into the larger ships.

Senator HAYDEN. Will this be the only deepwater harbor on the island?

Colonel Dixon. Except for Hilo, which is on the opposite side of the island. Hilo can handle ships of fair size.

Senator HAYDEN. What commodities would likely be shipped from the north side of the large island of Hawaii?

Colonel Dixon. The area is developing into a considerable agricultural area, sir. In addition, there are extensive cattle holdings. Sugar will apparently be the principal commodity, but there also is a development in pineapple going on which will add to the tonnage.

Senator HAYDEN. When I was there the last time, the cattle shipped had to be towed out into the water and then hoisted on to the ship.

Colonel Dixon. Under their own power, in some cases, I understand.

Senator HAYDEN. There was great difficulty about that, but I did not understand that it was much more than a cattle-raising country.

SUGAR DEVELOPMENT

Colonel Dixon. In the detailed study which we went into before the authorization of this project, it showed that there was considerable sugar development there.

I know of two large sugar plants.

General CHORPENING. I am sure the principal products will be sugar and pineapple. I think they have anticipated greater development on the north coast.

Colonel Dixon. Senator, in that regard, and working under difficult conditions, during the year 1952 there were 4,000 tons of sugar, 14,000 tons of molasses and 8,000 tons of pineapple shipped. That has every indication of being increased. .

Senator RUSSELL (presiding). Is this planning money of which you are speaking?

Colonel Dixon. Yes, sir.
Senator RUSSELL. How far is it from this harbor to Hilo?

Colonel Dixon. Eighty miles, sir, to the other side of the island. The topography of the island is such that it is a difficult road to travel. It is over a mountain range.

Senator RUSSELL. Yes. I have been on the island. They do have loads across there.

Colonel Dixon. There are roads; yes, sir.

General CHORPENING. There are roads, but I do not believe that there are any good highways, Senator. It would be difficult to construct them.

Senator RUSSELL. Could you drive a truck across there at the present time?

General CHORPENING. I think light trucks. I have not traversed that island for a quite a few years, myself, so I cannot speak up to date.

Senator HAYDEN. I went clear around the island at one time, but it was an ordinary passenger-carrying automobile. My recollection is that there would be deep cuts, so that you would go down into one and up another, and across all around the island.

The committee has heard testimony on the Demopolis and Warrior projects.

Senator KNOWLAND. We are familiar with those projects.

Colonel Dixon. The request for Jackson is $55,000 which will allow us to continue that planning. We have had to date $33,600 advance engineering and design funds. We will not be ready to go to construction until we get an additional $55,000, after the amount before the committee is appropriated. The benefit-to-cost ratio is 1.52 to 1.

Senator KNOWLAND. Do you have any questions on Jackson, Senator Hayden?

Senator HAYDEN. No.

REDONDO BEACH HARBOR, Calif.

Colonel Dixon. The next project is Redondo Beach Harbor in California. It was authorized by the 1950 River and Harbor Act.

This is a new start as far as planning is concerned. The project is estimated to cost $1,368,000. Benefit-to-cost ratio is 1.79 to i. We are requesting $50,000 which would give us enough money to advance the planning sufficiently so that in the year 1956 we could go to construction if money were appropriated for that purpose. The project involves reconstruction of an existing breakwater, and construction of a new segment of breakwater to protect this harbor.

Senator HAYDEN. This is to prevent beach erosion?

Colonel Dixon. Sir, it is a combination. Actually, the majority of the justification of the project which brings about the benefit-to-cost ratio is benefit to small craft by providing a harbor of refuge. There is, of course, the element of beach erosion. It is a different way of handling it because we are forming a harbor there with the existing jetties and extensions. Erosion is a very serious problem on the California coast, an area where we have some of the most severe wave action of any place in the United States.

Senator Haydex. That is why I asked the question.

Colonel Dixon. You perhaps have seen the picture in Life magazine of the damage done there. Local interests have a rather heavy responsibility in the project, compared to its size. We estimate that the cost to them will be $1,994,000 which involves dredging the harbor, furnishing land, building certain piers and walls, and so forth.

KAWAIHAE HARBOR, HAWAII Colonel Dixon. The next project for planning is Kawaihae Harbor on the island of Hawaii, which was authorized in 1950. The intention there is to construct a deep-draft harbor. At the present time the only deep-draft harbor on the rather large island of Hawaii is Hilo.

The cost of the Kawaihae Harbor project is $6,679,100. It has a benefit-to-cost ratio of 1.86 to 1. We are requesting $50,000 to initiate planning. $50,000 should put us in condition where we can go to construction when Congress sees fit to appropriate the necessary funds. It is a 35-foot harbor consisting of an entrance channel and a protected basin.

Senator HAYDEN. Is it possible for oceangoing ships now to get into this harbor at all?

Colonel Dixon. No, sir; there is no protected harbor there now for oceangoing ships. They carry the materials and the goods to be shipped out on small lighters for reloading into the larger ships.

Senator HAYDEN. Will this be the only deepwater harbor on the island?

Colonel Dixon. Except for Hilo, which is on the opposite side of the island. Hilo can handle ships of fair size.

Senator HAYDEN. What commodities would likely be shipped from the north side of the large island of Hawaii?

Colonel Dixon. The area is developing into a considerable agricultural area, sir. In addition, there are extensive cattle holdings. Sugar will apparently be the principal commodity, but there also is a development in pineapple going on which will add to the tonnage.

Senator HAYDEN. When I was there the last time, the cattle shipped had to be towed out into the water and then hoisted on to the ship.

Colonel Dixon. Under their own power, in some cases, I understand.

Senator HAYDEN. There was great difficulty about that, but I did not understand that it was much more than a cattle-raising country.

SUGAR DEVELOPMENT

Colonel Dixon. In the detailed study which we went into before the authorization of this project, it showed that there was considerable sugar development there.

I know of two large sugar plants.

General CHORPENING. I am sure the principal products will be sugar and pineapple. I think they have anticipated greater development on the north coast.

Colonel Dixon. Senator, in that regard, and working under difficult conditions, during the year 1952 there were 4,000 tons of sugar, 14,00*) tons of molasses and 8,000 tons of pineapple shipped. That has every indication of being increased.

Senator Russell (presiding). Is this planning money of which you are speaking ?

Colonel DIXON. Yes, sir.
Senator RusseLL. How far is it from this harbor to Hilo?

Colonel Dixox. Eighty miles, sir, to the other side of the island. The topography of the island is such that it is a difficult road to travel. It is over a mountain range.

Senator RUSSELL. Yes. I have been on the island. They do have roads across there.

Colonel Dixon. There are roads; yes, sir.

General CHORPENING. There are roads, but I do not believe that there are any good highways, Senator. It would be difficult to construct them.

Senator Rossell. Could you drive a truck across there at the present time!

General CHORPENING. I think light trucks. I have not traversed that island for a quite a few years, myself, so I cannot speak up to date.

Senator HAYDEN. I went clear around the island at one time, but it was an ordinary passenger-carrying automobile. My recollection is that there would be deep cuts, so that you would go down into one and up another, and across all around the island.

The committee has heard testimony on the Demopolis and Warrior projects.

Senator KNOWLAND. We are familiar with those projects.

Colonel Dixon. The request for Jackson is $55,000 which will allow us to continue that planning. We have had to date $33,600 advance engineering and design funds. We will not be ready to go to construction until we get an additional $55,000, after the amount before the committee is appropriated. The benefit-to-cost ratio is 1.52 to 1.

Senator KNOWLAND. Do you have any questions on Jackson, Senator Hayden?

Senator HAYDEN. No.

REDONDO BEach HARBOR, Calif. Colonel Dixon. The next project is Redondo Beach Harbor in California. It was authorized by the 1950 River and Harbor Act.

This is a new start as far as planning is concerned. The project is estimated to cost $4,368,000. Benefit-to-cost ratio is 1.79 to i. We are requesting $50,000 which would give us enough money to advance the planning sufficiently so that in the year 1956 we could go to construction if money were appropriated for that purpose. The project involves reconstruction of an existing breakwater, and construction of a new segment of breakwater to protect this harbor.

Senator HAYDEN. This is to prevent beach erosion?

Colonel Dixon. Sir, it is a combination. Actually, the majority of the justification of the project which brings about the benefit-to-cost ratio is benefit to small craft by providing a harbor of refuge. There is, of course, the element of beach erosion. It is a different way of handling it because we are forming a harbor there with the existing jetties and extensions. Erosion is a very serious problem on the California coast, an area where we have some of the most severe wave action of any place in the United States.

Senator HAYDEX. That is why I asked the question.

Colonel Dixon. You perhaps have seen the picture in Life magazine of the damage done there. Local interests have a rather heavy responsibility in the project, compared to its size. We estimate that the cost to them will be $1,994,000 which involves dredging the harbor, furnishing land, building certain piers and walls, and so forth.

KAWAIHAE HARBOR, HAWANI Colonel Dixon. The next project for planning is Kawaihae Harbor on the island of Hawaii, which was authorized in 1950. The intention there is to construct a deep-draft harbor. At the present time the only deep-draft harbor on the rather large island of Hawaii is Hilo.

The cost of the Kawaihae Harbor project is $6,679,100. It has a benefit-to-cost ratio of 1.86 to 1. We are requesting $50,000 to initiate planning. $50,000 should put us in condition where we can go to construction when Congress sees fit to appropriate the necessary funds. It is a 35-foot harbor consisting of an entrance channel and a protected basin.

Senator Hayden. Is it possible for oceangoing ships now to get into this harbor at all?

Colonel Dixon. No, sir; there is no protected harbor there now for oceangoing ships. They carry the materials and the goods to be shipped out on small lighters for reloading into the larger ships.

Senator HAYDEN. Will this be the only deepwater harbor on the island ?

Colonel Dixon. Except for Hilo, which is on the opposite side of the island. Hilo can handle ships of fair size.

Senator HAYDEN. What commodities would likely be shipped froin the north side of the large island of Hawaii!

Colonel Dixon. The area is developing into a considerable agricultural area, sir. In addition, there are extensive cattle holdings. Sugar will apparently be the principal commodity, but there also is a development in pineapple going on which will add to the tonnage.

Senator HAYDEN. When I was there the last time, the cattle shipped had to be towed out into the water and then hoisted on to the ship.

Colonel Dixon. Under their own power, in some cases, I understand.

Senator HAYDEN. There was great difficulty about that, but I did not understand that it was much more than a cattle-raising country.

SUGAR DEVELOPMENT

Colonel Dixon. In the detailed study which we went into before the authorization of this project, it showed that there was considerable sugar development there.

I know of two large sugar plants.

General CHORPENING. I am sure the principal products will be sugar and pineapple. I think they have anticipated greater development on the north coast.

Colonel Dixon. Senator, in that regard, and working under difficult conditions, during the year 1952 there were 4,000 tons of sugar, 14,000 tons of molasses and 8,000 tons of pineapple shipped. That has every indication of being increased.

Senator RUSSELL (presiding). Is this planning money of which you are speaking ?

Colonel Dixon. Yes, sir.
Senator RUSSELL. How far is it from this harbor to Hilo?

Colonel Dixon. Eighty miles, sir, to the other side of the island. The topography of the island is such that it is a difficult road to travel. It is over a mountain range.

Senator Russell. Yes. I have been on the island. They do have roads across there.

Colonel Dixon. There are roads; yes, sir.

General CHORIENING. There are roads, but I do not believe that there are any good highways, Senator. It would be difficult to construct them.

Senator RUSSELL Could you drive a truck across there at the present time?

General CHORPENING. I think light trucks. I have not traversed that island for a quite a few years, myself, so I cannot speak up to date.

Senator Hayden. I went clear around the island at one time, but it was an ordinary passenger-carrying automobile. My recollection is that there would be deep cuts, so that you would go down into one and up another, and across, all around the island.

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