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These improvements consist of: Fire department

$600,000 Floodway project--

2, 775, 000 Library

822, 000 Parks and parkways, (the park strip will extend along most of the right-of-way on the proposed floodway-

2, 200, 000 Police department--

329, 000 Sanitary sewers.

4, 540,000 Storm sewers.

2, 710, 000 Street improvements.

6,500,000 Traffic control..

200,000 Airports--

600,000 Fairgrounds--

4, 750, 000 Water department

10, 048, 000

Total funds available--

35, 974, 000 More than one-third of this investment within area to be protected.

On December 11, 1951, the county and Oklahoma City voted $7,427,000 to provide the right-of-way necessary to carry out the master plan for 52 miles of expressways around and through Oklahoma City. Funds include purchase of the right-of-way for the new military road leading from Oklahoma City to Tinker Field-also several miles of county highways.

Also, December 8, 1953, city and county funds for direct use on floodway project, $2,016,000.

In project area are bridges carrying United States Highways Nos. 62, 77 (military designations) 270 and 277; and State Highways Nos. 3, 41, and 74.

Thirty-three intra- and inter-State trucking firms have terminals in the flood plain area. A number of the heaviest electric power lines of the city, and its largest central substation are in the area.

The 2-mile width of the Oklahoma City oil field is traversed by the river area. Therein are 65 producing wells, 4 crude oil storage tank farms, 5 refineries, and a very large number of pipelines—both trunk and gathering lines, handling both crude oil and natural gas. State fairgrounds

The relocation of the present State fairgrounds was approved by vote of the people when $4,750,000 was made available for construction on a section of land now owned by the city. Modern, fireproof buildings for year-round use-new all-purpose arena seating 12,500 people—a great center for 4-H and FFAclosely tied in with the Oklahoma A. and M. College demonstration farm. The new area is located entirely within the area to be protected from floods by the Oklahoma floodway project.

The present State fairgrounds are now in the process of being converted to a Negro vocational high school, and other Negro public facilities, also subject to inundation at times of food. Construction of the Adway prject will expand the usable portion of this area, and materially help facilities for the Negro population.

Summarizing the city bond issue of $36 million-specific items are called to your attention, for the purpose of showing the importance of this area to be protected by the floodway project. More than one-third f the total bond issue funds are to be spent within the area to be protected. This money represents public improvements, and does not include money being spent by other units of the Government, such as for Federal highways, and for county and State highways and bridges. In addition, large amounts of privately owned utilities are making investments—such as railroads, gas and electric utilities, telephone and telegraph companies, private residences, business and industry, particularly oil production and refining.

Largest of the city's sewage disposal plants, recently completed at a cost of 4,500,000, and 7 sanitary sewer lines, 18 to 60 inches in size, are in the area.

Ten city water mains lie therein-other large lines urgently needed will be constructed soon.

Other major facilities within the area include: 17 telephone and telegraph lines; 1 radio transmitter station and tower (KTOK) ; cotton compress with 35,000 bale storage capacity; 1 large flour mill; 2 cotton seed crushing plants; 1 commercial airport, heavily used by 1-engine and light 2-engine aircraft; 1 steel fabricating plant; 1 steel compress; 2 large asphalt mixing plants; 1 large trailer manufacturing and numerous equipment, industrial and manufacturing plants. These and other essential public and private facilities are classified and have estimated value of land, improvements, equipment and stocks.

A more detailed summary of these improvements is included as a supplement. (1-A attached).

2. Classification and value of public and private utilities, industries and services

located within the flood plain

PUBLIC OWNED FACILITIES

$8,550,000

Public utilities : 10 waterlines, 7 large sanitary-sewer lines, recently

constructed $4,500,000 sewage disposal plant, various storm sewers

included in estimated value---Highways, bridges, and streets: Includes highways and bridges

carrying designated United States Military Highways Nos. 62 and 77 ; also United States Highways Nos. 270 and 277; State highways and bridges on Nos. 3, 41, and 74; 9 other local street

and bridge crossings; included in estimated value_. Educational facilities: New fair grounds and six white and Negro

public schools, estimated value--

5, 700,000

5, 275, 000

Total estimated value of publicly owned facilities (public

parks valued at $2,000,000 not included)---

19, 525,000

PRIVATELY OWNED FACILITIES AND SERVICES

Utilities : Includes 17 powerlines, largest electric substation in city, natural-gas-distributing lines, estimated value-

2, 475, 000 Transportation : 2 railroad passenger stations (1 for 2 lines) ; 3 rail

road freight depots; 3 railroad yards; 22 roundhouses; City Bus Co. shops, bus-storage yards, general headquarters; 33 interstate and intrastate truckline terminals and offices, shops, etc.; 1 commercial airport; estimated value----

10, 600, 000 Communication facilities : 17 local and long-distance telephone and

telegraph lines; 1 radio transmitter station and tower, estimated value

600,000 NOTE.—U. S. Post Office Department is in process of purchasing land for $3,300,000 structure in the flood plain where it plans to construct facility where all incoming and outgoing mail will

be received, worked, and dispatched. Oil wells, pipelines, storage, refining: Includes 65 producing oil

wells; 20 crude-oil trunk and gathering lines ; 36 natural-gas gathering and trunklines; 92 oil and gas pipelines; 4 oil storage tank “farms”; 5 refineries; producing and pump equipment; estimated value--

7,000, 000 Essential manufacturing and processing operations : Includes metal

supplies and processors; oilfield and refinery equipment and supplies; construction materials; meat and other foods ; livestock feeds; industrial and agricultural chemicals; truck body and trailer manufacturers; machine-shop products; mill and other woodworking operations; vegetable-oil processors; and others capable of converting to essential production, estimated value----- 29, 135, 000

NOTE.—Essential industries constitute over 90 percent of all

industry within the flood plain. Essential commercial operations : Includes industrial and construc

tion machinery supplies; construction materials distributors and warehousers; cold-storage plants; food wholesalers; farm-equipment suppliers; scrap-metal assemblers ; construction firm material and equipment yards; specialized services to essential industries; etc., estimated value.-

2,500,000 NOTE.-Approximately 30 percent of total commercial opera

tions in the area are essential. Residential housing—Population : Residences in the flood-plain house

approximately 14,000 people; lower residential areas are inundated with 12,000 cubic feet per second flood; all areas with 16,000 cubic feet per second flood. Recent construction has added to that reported by engineers; estimated value of residential properties and household goods--

10,000,000

2. Classification and value of public and private utilities, industries and services

located within the flood plain-Continued

PRIVATELY OWNED FACILITIES AND SERVICES—continued

Farm lands and production: Outside of the immediate environs of

the city, both upstream and downstream within the protective area, various agricultural operations are carried on; much of the farming area is very fertile; farm lands, improvements, stock, equipment and supplies are involved; these are regarded as essential operations; estimated value---

$2, 225, 000

Total value of essential privately owned facilities-Total value of essential publicly owned facilities--

64, 535, 000 19, 525, 000

Total value of all essential public and privately owned fa-
cilities

84,060, 000 Employment.Total employment in the flood plain area is estimated currently at 6,000. Employment in essential industries and services, public and private, is estimated at 3,000. Interference with employment is serious with 16,000-cubicteet-per-second flood.

Public health.-Many hundreds of acres of lowlands contain stagnant water, trash, dumps, and other disease- and insect-breeding conditions. Prevailing southerly winds blow disease carriers into the main business district where there is heavy concentration of workers, hotels, and restaurants. Construction of the floodway will eliminate all or practically all of these public health threats.

Planned public improvements.-In May 1950, Oklahoma City voted bond issues, totaling $36,000,000, for various public improvements, including the sum of $2,775,000 for acquisition of rights-of-way for the Oklahoma City Floodway, and local participation in first units of construction.

Also included was money for urgently needed water mains, sanitary-sewer and storm-sewer lines; urban highway, street, and other improvements which involve the flood plain of the North Canadian River to a major extent. Plans for this construction, and cost estimates, are based upon the assumption that the floodway will be constructed at once.

At least one-third of Oklahoma City, especially the area lying south of the North Canadian River, is now seriously handicapped in its daily operations by lack of these facilities, particularly water and sanitary sewer lines. These facilities must cross the river area to connect with central pumping and disposal points.

Military highways.-As stated earlier herein, United States Highways Nos. 62 and 77—which are a part of the designated military highway system of the Nation—cross this river bottom on presently designated routes.

The approved urban road system of the city, part of which is now under construction and for other parts of which the city has already acquired rightof-way, proposes the rerouting of both of these highways and of United States Highway No. 66, also of military designation, through the flood-plain area. This rerouting is based upon assumption that approved plans for the floodway will be carried out.

Lands to be acquired by the city for the floodway rights-ow-way will also provide rights-of-way for approximately 7 miles of the urban highway system, carrying these three military highways.

SUPPLEMENT No. 1-A

ESTIMATE OF THE VALUE OF ESSENTIAL MANUFACTURING AND PROCESSING OPERA

TIONS LOCATED IN THE FLOOD PLAIN OF 1923 FLOOD I am listing below those operations which include metal fabricators and processors; oilfield and refinery equipment and supplies; construction materials; meat and other foods; livestock feeds; industrial and agricultural chemi. cals; truck body and trailer manufacturers; machine-shop products; mill and other woodworking operations; vegetable-oil processors; and other capable of converting to essential production.

Firm

Address

Product

Estimated

value

$100,000

450,000 50,000

50,000 1,500,000

70,000 80,000 800,000

125,000 4,000,000

90,000 75,000 200,000

75,000 150,000

75,000 1,500,000

50,000 50,000 200,000

80,000 600,000

90,000 350,000 100.000 250.000 200 000 75,000

130,000

80,000 250,000

A RK Manufacturing Co... 1321 South Walker.. Cast bronze and aluminum

products. Acme Flour Mills Co.1

19 Southwest 12th.

Flour and feed
Acme Millwork & Supply Co. 515 North Kentucky. Millwork
Adams-Irick Truck Body Works.. 1429 West California. Truck bodies and trailers...
American Body & Trailer, Inc..-- 1500 Exchange Ave.. Trailer and bus equipment

for Army ordnance, con

tinuous production, Atlee Dairy

1601 Exchange Ave.. Dairy products.. Barada & Page, Inc.

203 South Compress Chemicals Beatrice Foods Co.

316-22 North Western. Dairy products. Relsky Manufacturing Co., Inc... 800 West California. Refrigeration cases. Black, Sivalls & Bryson, Inc.'.. 2131 Westwood...

Tanks, oil and gas separators,

etc. W. H. Butcher Packing Co. 101 Southeast 8th.

Meat products Butts Electric Works.

Mair and Pennsylvania.. Armature winding. California Spray Chemical Co. 1010 East Reno.

Chemicals. Canadian Valley Meat Co.

1240 Southwest 15th.. Meatpacking Capitol Bag Co...

1621-29 West Grand. Burlap, mesh, and cotton

bags. Clayton-Dorris Co., Inc.

103 South Pennsylvania... Furniture. Continental Baking Co.

121 West Washington.. Bakery. Cornett Packing Co....

200 East Choctaw.

Meat products.. Domar Manufacturing Co., Inc.- 2 South Pennsylvania. Plastic molding, etc. Double Eagle Refining Co.

1900 Northeast 1st.

Petroleum refining products Drug Sundries, Inc..

1542 East Reno

Drugs and cosmetics. Eagle-Picher Co., paint and var- 1801 West Grand..

Paint and varnish. nish division. Enterprise Foundry, Inc.!

817 South Broadway. Grey iron castings Executive Furniture, Inc.1. 911 South Walker..

Desks, radio cabinets, etc... Frisco Packing Co..

644 South Walnut.

Meatpacking Governair Corp.

513 North Blackwelder. Air conditioning equipment. Harris Meat Packing Co

1616 West Reno...

Meatpacking
Industrial Gasket & Packing Co., 801 South Walker.

Gaskets and packing-
Inc.
Industrial Machine Co...

1546 West Reno...

Steel fabrication and ma

chinery. International Manufacturing Co.- 600 East Grand.

Air-conditioning equipment Jennings Mills, Inc..

216 South Compress. Feeds. flour and grain mill

products. Fred Jones Manufacturing Co... 215 West Washington.. Engines rebuilt and auto

parts manufactured. Harry Keeton Sup. Co..

1522 West Main.

Cotton felt, mattress ticks.L. & 8. Bearing Co.

3 North Pennsylvania. Bearings Linde Air Products Co.

1000 Southwest 2d..

Industrial gases. Lumberman's Supply Co.

1530 West Main...

Millwork. Mac's Supply Co.

2727 West Reno.

Gasoline storage tanks. Makins Sand and Gravel Co. 100 Southeast 4th..

Sand, gravel and concrete. Geo. E. Martin & Co.l.

19 North Dewey.

Leather goods. Metropolitan Paving Co..

300 South Indiana.

Asphalt paving Monarch Refineries, Inc.

2800 East 4th

Petroleum refiningMidwestern Perlite Corp.

201 North Eastern

Lightweight aggregate. Morgan Sash & Door Co.

1100 Southwest 3d...

Millwork.
Mud Control Laboratory, Inc. 1832 West Reno.

Oilfield tools
W. L, Oakes Manufacturing Co. 615 Southwest 9th St. Ladders, millwork.
Oklahoma Bed Springs Co.. 712 South Broadway. Mattresses, springs, and

bedding. Oklahoma Gear Works.

325 Southwest 6th.. Gears and chain sprockets... Oklahoma Oxygen Co..

Exchange and Kentucky - Oxygen, industrial gases. Oklahoma Waste Material Co.. 1100 East Reno.

Wiping rags.. Para-Lac Chemical Co...

1245 South Eastern..

Oil well chemicals. Peoples Packing Co., Inc.

103 Southeast 8th St. Meatpacking. Planet Oil & Refining Co.

416 North Eastern.

Lubricating oils. Precision Machine Works.

1705 Southeast 15th St. Auto parts and accessories. Producers Cooperative Oil Mill. 5 East Frisco..

Cottonseed products. C. W. Rathburn Co.

800 West Grand.

Truck bodies and trailers. Reliable Tent & Awning Co.. 324 West Reno.

Awnings, etc... Boisman Products Co.

207 South Compress Laundry bleach, etc.. Seck Trailer Manufacturing Co.. 1345 West Reno...

Custom-built truck trailers

and bodies. Soil Booster Corp.

2501 East 4th St.

Fertilizer Southwest Awning Co..

217 South Broadway Truck tarpaulins, etc. Southwest Factory, Inc..

1432 West Main St.

Propane tanks, steel fabri.

cation. Southwestern Cotton Oil Co. 6 East Chickasaw.

Cottonseed products. Southwestern Supply & Machine do..

Conveying equipment.. Works. 1 Firms now in production on defense contracts or defense subcontracts.

1,000,000

200,000 450,000

75,000 150.000

75,000 250.000

75,000 1, 200,000 5,000,000

150,000 400,000 150,000

90.000 125,000

50,000 50,000 250,000

75,000 100.000 150.000

75,000 125,000 50.000 75.000 25,000 50,000

75,000 25.000 150.000

125.000 100,000

[blocks in formation]

1 Firms now in production on defense contracts or defense subcontracts.

GENERAL STATEMENT

Mr. CUNNINGHAM. The mayor and city council have approved this report and have asked me to express to the chairman and the committee their sincere appreciation in our having this opportunity to renew our request for continuation of the construction of the Oklahoma City Floodway project, North Canadian River.

We have had the fullest cooperation, of course, of the engineers, and the retiring general has been very cooperative on this project for many years. The project is under construction and we hope that the construction may continue. When the project was first initiated, we had hoped for a 3-year completion; but we feel we should be tolerant under present conditions. We are hopeful, however, that the committee can see fit to recommend the amount set up in the President's budget fund. I would like to call your attention to the local interests who have provided almost $5 million to this project, which is more than the Federal funds at this time.

We are buying the right-of-way and taking care of the local utilities. In the next phase in which we are doing the local work there are some 82 oil and gas lines which have to be removed to clear the right-of-way. That work is underway to get ready for the excavation handled by the Corps of Engineers.

LOCAL INTEREST

The three bond issues which we have had are evidence of the local interest, and all of our city planning is based upon this project and its completion as soon as possible. I also think as evidence of the local interest is the fact since 1950 when the contract between the city and the Federal agency was signed there has been an average of $5,833,000 in new construction, private construction going into that area.

In the belief that the work will continue and go on, that is. So there has been more than $20 million in new construction. Our new fairground has under contract almost $5 million worth of work there. The old fairground is being turned over to educational purposes. The annual flood loss will be reduced to a minimum when the project is completed. It is one of a series of projects on the North Canadian.

With this Oklahoma City project that will be the third project in controlling our floods. There is one authorized project not started yet. So we are very hopeful the committee can see fit to recommend the present appropriation or to continue the work which will bring it right through the heart of the city. It runs through the populated district of the city.

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