Page images
PDF
EPUB
[blocks in formation]

$15,000,000

: $60,000

: $75,000

$14, 865, 000

tion projects in 35 locations, 2 of which are in
+ina and for which no funds have been
These 2 projects are: (1) Missoula;

Il Control Acts. Plan
it of a cutoff

et to

81, 900

: $5,000

76, 900

[ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][ocr errors]

reen Peter projects, flood-control projects such the River (where power can also be generated); in works on the Calapooya River; projects prors for multiple-purpose use on the Grand Ronde nany projects which were postponed because of ently needed. r the President's promises to be kept.

rea should have brought new starts on authorized i new projects. Work on these projects no longer · military needs, and indeed, would strengthen the ited States. New starts on needed projects would

ems left in the wake of the armistice. wale military operations in Korea is out of date for

[ocr errors][merged small]

endations do not include sufficient funds to resume a

Funds for survey reports, the first step toward new it is unlikely that any new studies can be undertaken. in unscheduled by the engineers because there are not them. irvey purposes must be restored to normal levels. The is where projects, such as the proposed water storage and ve Yamhill River Basin, are needed must not be the victims m.

All *

nance commendations as to funds for preservation, operation, e of existing harbor and river works do not meet all current Sufficient to provide assurance that authorized depths and ind rivers will be maintained. regon are to take their place in the Pacific coast forward deal funds are needed for operation and maintenance of shipping lumbia River serving the ports of Astoria, Portland, The Dalles,

at Coos Bay, and on the rivers which meet the sea on the roast.

108

ce of new heavy public works in the President's recommendations inwide adverse effect on industry and will seriously hamper the 1, is shown in a letter which I received a few days ago from George esident of the Guy F. Atkinson Co., one of the west coast's leading 'tion contractors.

e absence of new starts in the recommendations, Mr. Atkinson said, on, it is necessary both for defense purposes and for the general he industry that major public works be built in a sufficient volume

industry alive and healthy. Any curtailment so drastic that it ples the industry is penny-wise and pound-foolish.” hat during the last war much of the country's ability to mobilize os rapidly was due to the ease with which major construction organiza

called into service for large installations and heavy works, he dee present condition in the industry: "With virtually no work to even any major organizations are faced with the prospect of being disbanded. dverse effect on the heavy equipment industry will not be far behind, lack of new work to be started will be felt in many industrial States," kinson said. “We feel that we must vigorously call your attention to the of the present policy and the permanent injury to both the construction and nent industries." uployment in Oregon ! a letter written to the Director, Bureau of the Budget, on December 24, 1953, or to the recommendations, I told him that according to a report issued by the agon State Unemployment Compensation Commission, unemployment in Oregon is the highest in the Nation. The latest figures which I have been able to obtain from the United States epartment of Labor, for the week ending February 13, 1954, show covered unemloyment of 11.4 percent in Oregon, as compared to an unemployment average of 6 percent for the rest of the Nation.

[graphic]

In addition to John Day and Green Peter projects, flood-control projects such as Cougar Dain on the McKenzie River (where power can also be generated); drainage and channel construction works on the Cala pooya River; projects providing for retention of floodwaters for multiple-purpose use on the Grand Ronde River and its tributaries; and many projects which were postponed because of the hostilities in Korea, are urgently needed.

The people of Oregon wait for the President's promises to be kept.

Cessation of hostilities in Korea should have brought new starts on authorized projects, and authorization of new projects. Work on these projects no longer would be in competition with military needs, and indeed, would strengthen the military potential of the United States. New starts on needed projects would belp solve the economic problems left in the wake of the armistice.

Planning geared to full-scale military operations in Korea is out of date for Oregon in 1934 and 1955. Curtailed surrey program

The President's recommendations do not include sufficient funds to resume a normal survey program. Funds for survey reports, the first step toward new projects, are so low that it is unlikely that any new studies can be undertaken. Authorized reports remain unscheduled by the engineers because there are not enough funds to support them.

Appropriations for survey purposes must be restored to normal levels. The people of Oregon in areas where projects, such as the proposed water storage and ilood control works in the Yamhill River Basin, are needed must not be the victims of a shortsighted program. Operation and maintenance

The President's recommendations as to funds for preservation, operation, Inaintenance, and care of existing harbor and river works do not meet all current nerds. They are insufficient to provide assurance that authorized depths and widths of channels and rivers will be maintained.

If the ports of Oregon are to take their place in the Pacific coast forward defense line, additional funds are needed for operation and maintenance of shipping facilities on the Columbia River serving the ports of Astoria, Portland, The Dalles, and other points; at Coos Bay, and on the rivers which meet the sea on the southern Oregon coast. Effect on industries

That the absence of new heavy public works in the President's recommendations will have a nationwide adverse effect on industry and will seriously hamper the defense program, is shown in a letter which I received a few days ago from George H. Atkinson, president of the Guy F. Atkinson Co., one of the west coast's leading heavy construction contractors.

Protesting the absence of new starts in the recommendations, Mr. Atkinson said, “In our opinion, it is necessary both for defense purposes and for the general economy of the industry that major public works be built in a sufficient volume to keep the industry alive and healthy. Any curtailment so drastic that it actually cripples the industry is penny-wise and pound-foolish."

Stating that during the last war much of the country's ability to mobilize its resources rapidly was due to the ease with which major construction organizations were called into service for large installations and heavy works, he de. scribed the present condition in the industry: "With virtually no work to even bid on, many major organizations are faced with the prospert of being disbanded.

"The adverse effect on the heavy equipment industry will not be far behind, and the lack of new work to be started will be felt in many industrial States." Mr. Atkinson said. "We feel that we must vigoroumly call your attention to the fallacy of the present policy and the permanent injury to both the construction and equipment industries." Unemployment in Oregon

In a letter written to the Dirertor, Purean of the Budget, on December 24, 1963, prior to the resummendations. I told him that according to a raport immued by the Oregon State (temployment Compensation Commission, unemployment in Oregon *as the highest in the Nation.

The latot timo" which I have been able to obtain from the United State Twartment of Lalap, for the work end ng February 13, 14 A show covered upemplosiest of 1145*pent in Oregon, as empared to an unemployment average of 6 patient for the rest of the Nation.

[ocr errors]

The February report of the Oregon State Unemployment Compensation Commission shows that, with the exception of lumber and logging, there is more unemployment in the construction industry than any other in Oregon.

Business, labor, and farm groups are apprehensive that the spring pickup is business will be smaller this year, leading to higher than usual unemployment throughout most of the spring and leaving only a brief period of relief from bigh unemployment during the summer months. Contributing to these fears is the number of persons exhausting unemployment insurance; there has been an increase of about 30 percent in the period from July 1953 to January 1954 over the same period the year before.

Administration spokesmen have sought to reassure us that plans have been made for public works construction to counteract a future recession or a depression I submit that a recession is here now, and an immediate program of public works must replace the program of procrastination now being pursued by the administration. Oregon needs power

On May 5, 1953, the Secretary of the Interior, a former Governor of Oregon, stated that the Pacific Northwest is "now critically short of power so necessary for its own economic well-being and also for the defense effort." The state ment was made as part of an argument that small private power projects should be considered ahead of the Hells Canyon project; but as a report on the power situation it was true.

Last year people in numerous Oregon communities suffered a 20-percent sucharge on their electricity bills. This was granted by the Oregon Utilities Com mission in response to power company claims that it was needed to sfiset additional costs of steam generation of power during low-water periods aggressive program of power production is needed to avert future shortages

Oregon needs not only new construction to counteraet growing unemployi and power to supply its present demands—it requires a sufficiency of pm take care of expanding industry, potential defense needs, and an in population.

Existing plans for dam construction contemplated by the Arn and the Department of the Interior will barely suffice to meet norr requirements during the next decade. Delays in projects une: and the failure to make new starts on authorized projects, wi the economic future of the Northwest and weaken the nation:

I urge that the committee turn aside the recommendati of a false economy—that it adopt an enlightened progr problems of crippled industry and unemployed workers stability by the wise use of public works; provide for of our food-producing potential by new starts on?" and soil-conservation projects; and fully realize the streams and rivers. In this way private indust" interest will be served.

I would appreciate having this letter inclu hearings.

Sincerely yours,

[merged small][graphic][subsumed][subsumed]
« PreviousContinue »