Let Right Be Done: Aboriginal Title, the Calder Case, and the Future of Indigenous Rights

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Hamar Foster, Heather Raven, Jeremy Webber
UBC Press, Nov 1, 2011 - Law - 704 pages
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In the early 1970s, many questioned whether Aboriginal title existed in Canada and rejected the notion that Aboriginal peoples should have rights different from those of other citizens. But in 1973 the Supreme Court of Canada issued a landmark decision in the Calder case, confirming that Aboriginal title constituted a right within Canadian law.

Let Right Be Done examines the doctrine of Aboriginal title thirty years later and puts the Calder case in its legal, historical, and political context, both nationally and internationally. With its innovative blend of scholarly analysis and input from many of those intimately involved in the case, this book should be essential reading for anyone interested in Aboriginal law, treaty negotiations, and the history of the "BC Indian land question."

 

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Contents

1 The Calder Decision Aboriginal Title Treaties and the Nisgaa
1
Reflections of the Calder Participants
35
Historical Background
59
Calder and Its Implications
99
International Impact
153
The Future
199
Appendices
231
Notes
246
Bibliography
298
Contributors
322
Index
324
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About the author (2011)

Hamar Foster is Professor of Law at the University of Victoria. Heather Raven is Senior Lecturer in Law at the University of Victoria. Jeremy Webber holds the Canada Research Chair in Law and Society at the University of Victoria and is a Trudeau Fellow.

Contributors: Michael Asch, John Borrows, Hamar Foster, Christina Godlewska, Stephen Haycox, Honourable G rard V. La Forest, Kent McNeil, Garth Nettheim, Brian Slattery, Jeremy Webber, David V. Williams

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