Moses Mendelssohn: Philosophical Writings

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Cambridge University Press, 1997 - Philosophy - 321 pages
Mendelssohn's Philosophical Writings, published in 1761, bring the metaphysical tradition to bear on the topic of "sentiments" (defined as knowledge or awareness by way of the senses). They include a nuanced defense of Leibniz's theodicy and conception of freedom, and examination of the ethics of suicide, an account of the "mixed sentiments" so central to the tragic genre, an hypothesis about weakness of will, an elaboration of the main principles and types of art, and a brief tract on probability theory, aimed at rebutting Hume's skepticism.
 

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Contents

Preface
1
On sentiments
5
Dialogues
94
Rhapsody or additions to the Letters on sentiments
129
On the main principles of the fine arts and sciences
167
On the sublime and naive in the fine sciences
190
On probability
231
On evidence in metaphysical sciences
249
On the ability to know the ability to feel and the ability to desire
305
what does to enlighten mean?
309
Index
316
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