Homilies on Genesis 18–45 (The Fathers of the Church, Volume 82)

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CUA Press, Feb 1, 2001 - Religion - 493 pages
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John Chrysostom, called the "golden-mouthed" for his eloquent preaching, continues in this second volume of the sixty-seven Genesis homilies to provide instruction for the moral reformation of the Christians of Antioch. He continues in Homily 18 with Genesis 3 and finishes in Homily 45 with Genesis 20. They seem to have been delivered perhaps as early as 385, half just before and during Lent and the remainder, from Homily 33 onward, after Pentecost.

That Chrysostom favored Antiochene exegesis is clear from his exhortation at the beginning of Homily 20 to "take up the thread of the reading and apply...the teaching from the passage." "You see," he writes, "there is not even a syllable or even one letter contained in Scripture which does not have great treasure concealed in its depth." He artfully interprets the literal spiritual meaning of this treasure for his congregation through inspiring and colorful exegesis.

It was Chrysostom's pastoral responsibility to guide his congregation by means of homiletic exegesis. He urged his listeners to take note of the instruction and to give attention to the correction of their own daily lives so as to "proceed to the enjoyment of salvation." The theme of the good man Noe, who remained unaffected by the universal decline of mankind into wickedness, provides the example for the moral improvement of his listeners in Homilies 23-29, as does the hospitality of Abraham in Homilies 41-45.

The Genesis homilies reveal Chrysostom as commentator, preacher, moralist, and profoundly theological and precise exegete of Scripture, the truth of which he teaches for the betterment of this congregation.

 

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Contents

Abbreviations
ix
Homily 19
21
Homily 20
35
Homily 21
50
Homily 22
68
Homily 23
87
Homily 24
104
Homily 25
124
Homily 33
276
Homily 34
289
Homily 35
304
Homily 36
324
Homily 37
340
Homily 38
355
Homily 39
374
Homily 40
389

Homily 26
144
Homily 27
162
Homily 28
183
Homily 29
198
Homily 30
220
Homily 31
237
Homily 32
254
Homily 41
400
Homily 42
418
Homily 43
436
Homily 44
455
Homily 45
469
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About the author (2001)

John Chrysostom, born at Antioch towards 347, was a great genius and his poweful eloquence earned him the surname of Chrysostom, or golden mouthed. He is known for his preaching, exegesis, and liturgical reforms. His skills were especially directed to the instruction and moral reformation of the people of Antioch. In terms of scriptural exegesis, he spoke for a literal interpretation of the text against the allegorical school that was prominent in Alexandria. With St. Athanasius, St. Gregory of Nazianzen, and St. Basil, he forms the group of the four great doctors of the Eastern Church. In 398 he became Patriarch of Constantinople. His courage in branding vice caused him to be exiled and ill-treated. John Chrysostom died at Comana in Pontus on September 14, 407.

Hill teaches in the School of Studies in Religion at the University of Sydney.

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