Islam, Law, and Equality in Indonesia: An Anthropology of Public Reasoning

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, May 29, 2003 - Political Science - 289 pages
0 Reviews
In Indonesia, the world's largest Muslim-majority country, Muslims struggle to reconcile radically different sets of social norms and laws, including those derived from Islam, local social norms, and contemporary ideas about gender equality and law. Here, John Bowen explores this struggle through archival and ethnographic research and through interviews with national religious and legal figures. The book speaks to debates in any society where people struggle to live together with deep differences in values and ways of life. It will be welcomed by scholars and students across the social sciences.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Law religion and pluralism
3
Adats local inequalities
22
Remapping adat
44
The contours of the courts
67
The judicial history of consensus
89
The poisoned gift
123
Historicizing scripture justifying equality
147
Whose word is law?
173
Gender equality in the family?
200
Justifying religious boundaries
229
Public reasoning across cultural pluralism
253
References
269
Index
283
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (2003)

John R. Bowen is Dunbar-Van Cleve Professor in Arts and Sciences, Professor of Anthropology, and Chair of the Program in Social Thought and Analysis at Washington University, St Louis. He is the author of Sumatran Politics and Poetics (1991), Muslims through Discourse (1993), Religions through Practice, 2nd edition (2001), and the co-editor of Critical Comparisons in Politics and Culture (Cambridge, 1999).

John R. Bowen is Dunbar-Van Cleve Professor in Arts and Sciences, Professor of Anthropology, and Chair of the Program in Social Thought and Analysis at Washington University, St Louis. He is the author of Sumatran Politics and Poetics (1991), Muslims through Discourse (1993), Religions through Practice, 2nd edition (2001), and the co-editor of Critical Comparisons in Politics and Culture (Cambridge, 1999).

Bibliographic information